South Carolina A to Z

South Carolina from A to Z Archive (2011-2014)

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2014

September 2014

Pinckney Island Wildlife Refuge
September 12, 2014

"P" is for Pinckney Island Wildlife Refuge. Pinckney Island Wildlife Refuge is in Beaufort County, between Skull Creek and Mackay Creek. The Refuge was established in 1975 and opened in 1985. It is comprised of four islands: Corn, Little Harry, Big Harry, and Pinckney. The largest island, Pinckney, is the only one open to the public. From 1736 to 1936 the refuge was owned by the family and descendants of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney and was a cotton plantation. From 1937 until 1975, the island was managed as a game preserve. Nearly two-thirds of the refuge consists of salt marsh and tidal creeks. During spring and summer, the freshwater ponds host large concentrations of nesting ibis, herons, and egrets. Pinckney Island Wildlife Refuge provides hiking and biking trails excellent for wildlife observation and photography.

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Medal of Honor Recipients
September 11, 2014

"M" is for Medal of Honor Recipients. Approved by Congress in 1862, the Medal of Honor is America's highest award for military valor. The first native son to receive the award was Ernest A. Garlington of Newberry for "distinguished gallantry" at the Battle of Wounded Knee in 1892. Eight South Carolinians were awarded the medal during World War I. During World War II, five Carolinians were awarded the medal. During the Korean War, three of the four men were presented the honor posthumously. Seven Carolinians were awarded the medal during America's involvement in Vietnam, including the last medal presented during that conflict. All together, thirty native sons of South Carolina have been awarded the medal for "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity" above that of their comrades in arms—one third of them made the supreme sacrifice.

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Longstreet, James Peter
September 10, 2014

"L" is for Longstreet, James Peter [1821-1904]. Soldier. Born in Edgefield District, Longstreet spent his formative years in Georgia and Alabama. After graduating from West Point, he had a successful army career, serving with distinction in the Mexican war and achieving the rank of major. In 1861, he resigned his US Army commission and joined the Confederate Army as a brigadier general. He distinguished himself as a superb military tactician and in 1862 Robert E. Lee made him his second in command. After Gettysburg he was transferred to the Western Theater where he won an impressive victory at Chickamauga. Returning to Virginia, he served brilliantly in the Battle at the Wilderness. After the war James Peter Longstreet settled in New Orleans and alienated many postwar southerners by joining the Republican Party.

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Hipp, Francis Moffett
September 09, 2014

"H" is for Hipp, Francis Moffett [1911-1995]. Insurance executive. After graduating from Furman, Hipp joined his father's company, Liberty Life Insurance. The Greenville-based firm also owned radio stations in Columbia and Charleston. When Hipp's father died in 1943, the company's directors elected him president and chairman of the board. An energetic leader, Hipp expanded the company into the Southeast through its own agents and nationally through financial institutions. In 1950, the Broadcasting Company of the South was formed for the company's broadcasting entities—and, in 1953, launched its first television station. In 1967 the Liberty Corporation was created, with Liberty Life, Cosmos Broadcasting, and Surety Investments merged into it. As chairman of the State Development Board from 1959 to 1963, Francis Moffett Hipp was credited with major successes in recruiting new industry to South Carolina.

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Blackwood, Ibra Charles
September 08, 2014

"B" is for Blackwood, Ibra Charles [1878-1936]. Governor. After graduating from Wofford, Blackwood read law and was admitted to the bar. He represented Spartanburg in the General Assembly and served as solicitor of the Seventh Judicial Circuit. He made an unsuccessful bid for governor in 1926, but was elected in 1930. He entered office with the Great Depression well underway in South Carolina. In 1932, he joined Senator James F. Byrnes in endorsing Franklin Roosevelt for the presidency. Roosevelt's victory brought an avalanche of New Deal assistance to the state, including the Agricultural Adjustment Act and the Civilian Conservation Corps. One of the most lasting of the New Deal projects was the massive Santee Cooper electrification project, which was secured through the extensive lobbying efforts of Senator Byrnes and Governor Ibra Charles Blackwood.

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Charleston Riot
September 05, 2014

“C” is for the Charleston Riot [1876]. As the crucial local, state, and national elections of 1876 approached, tensions between the races in South Carolina reached a boiling point. In Charleston black Republicans were especially incensed by Democratic attempts to induce blacks to vote Democratic. On September 6th, after a Democratic rally, a group of Republicans pursued the participants. A white Democrat fired a pistol that instead of frightening his pursuers attracted an even larger crowd. The Democrats retreated and asked for protection from federal troops. A full-scale riot erupted and lasted for several days with black residents assaulting any white person venturing outside. The activism and aggression against whites displayed in the Charleston Riot set the city apart from other Southern cities during Reconstruction where blacks tended to be the victims rather than the aggressors.

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Blake, Joseph
September 04, 2014

“B” is for Blake, Joseph [1663-1700]. Governor. Born in England, Blake was a leader of the Dissenter political faction in South Carolina and a supporter of the Lords Proprietors in their disputes with local political leaders. He was in the colony by 1689 and shortly thereafter was named a proprietary deputy and member of the Grand Council. From 1696 to 1700 Blake was acting governor. His term was marked by local disputes and conflict with the British Surveyor of customs who accused the governor of bribery, fraud, trading with pirates and the Spanish in Florida, and abuses of British customs laws. The Surveyor’s reports back to England led to a sweeping review of all proprietary charters in America. Joseph Blake’s death led to a power struggle in the colony over his successor.

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Winnsboro
September 03, 2014

“W” is Winnsboro [Fairfield County, population 3,599]. Winnsboro, the seat of Fairfield County, lies in the Piedmont on a ridge between the Broad and Wateree Rivers. In 1768 John Winn began acquiring land that would become Winnsboro. During the Revolution, Lord Cornwallis and the British Army occupied the town. Incorporated in 1832, the town was named for Revolutionary War hero Richard Winn. The town became a religious and educational center—home to Mount Zion Academy, Furman Academy and Theological Institution, and Fairfield Institute. Cotton brought prosperity to the county. There are a number of distinguished buildings in town. Among them are the old courthouse, begun in 1822 but later redesigned by Robert Mills and the town clock, a two-story rectangular brick structure. For much of the 20th century, the Winnsboro Cotton Mills were the economic mainstay of Winnsboro.“W” is Winnsboro [Fairfield County, population 3,599]. Winnsboro, the seat of Fairfield County, lies in the Piedmont on a ridge between the Broad and Wateree Rivers. In 1768 John Winn began acquiring land that would become Winnsboro. During the Revolution, Lord Cornwallis and the British Army occupied the town. Incorporated in 1832, the town was named for Revolutionary War hero Richard Winn. The town became a religious and educational center—home to Mount Zion Academy, Furman Academy and Theological Institution, and Fairfield Institute. Cotton brought prosperity to the county. There are a number of distinguished buildings in town. Among them are the old courthouse, begun in 1822 but later redesigned by Robert Mills and the town clock, a two-story rectangular brick structure. For much of the 20th century, the Winnsboro Cotton Mills were the economic mainstay of Winnsboro.

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Sewees
September 02, 2014

“S” is for Sewees. The Sewees were a Native American nation based along the Santee River and the Sea Islands. In 1670 it was the Sewees who showed the English colonists the best harbors. They helped the Carolinians against the Spanish and supplied the settlers with food when the colony ran short. The tribe was decimated by smallpox and by an ill-fated attempt to trade directly across the Atlantic with England. A fleet of canoes was swamped by a storm and many drowned; those that survived were picked up by an English slave ship and sold into slavery in the West Indies. By 1700 only a handful of the tribe remained alive in the colony. Other tribes absorbed them, and the Sewees  ceased to exist as a distinct group by the early 18th century. 

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Robertson, Benjamin Franklin, Jr.
September 01, 2014

“R” is for Robertson, Benjamin Franklin, Jr. [1903-1943]. Journalist. Robertson was a well-respected and well-traveled journalist and war correspondent and the author of three books. In 1940 he was hired by PM, a newspaper, as its London correspondent during the Battle of Britain. In 1941 he published I Saw England, a well-received account of British resolve during the blitz. After another stint in London, he returned home and began work on Red Hills and Cotton: An Upcountry Memory. During 1942 Robertson covered the war from Libya, the Soviet Union, and India for PM. In January 1943 he was hired by the New York Herald-Tribune to run its London Bureau. On his way back to London in 1943, Benjamin Franklin Robertson, Jr., was killed when the flying boat Yankee Clipper crashed in the harbor, of Lisbon, Portugal.

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August 2014

Pinckney, Maria Henrietta
August 29, 2014

“P” is for Pinckney, Maria Henrietta [d. 1836]. Writer. The eldest daughter of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney and Sarah Middleton, Maria Pinckney is notable for writing a defense of nullification entitled The Quintessence of Long Speeches, Arranged as a Political Catechism. She published the “Catechism” in Charleston in 1830, two years after the General Assembly had issued Calhoun’s “Exposition and Protest.” In her tract, Pinckney posed a series of 34 questions and answers designed to summarize the southern case for nullification, which she defined as “the Veto of a Sovereign State on an unconstitutional law of Congress.” She did not believe that South Carolina’s assertion of her sovereignty would lead to civil war. In it “hour of peril,” Maria Henrietta Pinckney called on South Carolinians to follow the example of “the patriot band who achieved the Revolution” of 1776 and their descendants.

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Medical University of South Carolina
August 28, 2014

“M” is for Medical University of South Carolina. At the request of the Medical Society of South Carolina, the General Assembly established the Medical College of South Carolina. It opened in 1824 as a private institution. In the last two decades of the 19th century, programs in pharmacy and nursing began. The faculty voted to admit women medical students in 1895. In 1913 Dean Robert Wilson campaigned for state ownership of the Medical College, whereby the state would assume some financial responsibility for the school. State ownership was achieved in 1914. The seventeen-year leadership of James B. Edwards saw major growth in endowment and research programs. The Medical University of South Carolina was widely acknowledged as a major academic health care center, maintaining its commitment to health sciences, education, research, and patient care.

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Lott, Robert Bretley
August 27, 2014

“L” is for Lott, Robert Bretley [b. 1958]. Author, educator. A native of California, Lott received his MFA from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Though reared in California, he considers himself a Southerner: “My family is from East Texas and Mississippi—I grew up drinking sweet tea….” In 1986 he became writer-in-residence at the College of Charleston. He began publishing his short stories in 1983—and his fiction and essays have appeared in dozens of literary journals. The primary focus of his writing lies within the homes and hearts of middle-class Americans, average people leading average lives, seeking happiness, and struggling against despair. Jewel, his most acclaimed novel, has been translate into a half-dozen languages and was an Oprah Book Club selection. Robert Bretley Lott directed the Charleston Writers’ Conference from 1989 to 1994. 

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Historic Charleston Foundation
August 26, 2014

“H” is for Historic Charleston Foundation [HCF]. The Historic Charleston Foundation sprang from the activities of the Carolina Art Association. In 1944, the association published This is Charleston, a survey of historic buildings. In 1947, HCF was incorporated as a separate organization to preserve buildings still occupied by their owners, instead of museums. To raise money, HCF sponsored its first Festival of Homes and saved important structures such as the Nathaniel Russell House. In 1958 HCF became the first preservation organization in the country to establish a revolving fund for the purchase and restoration of historic properties; the fund was replenished when the buildings were sold to new occupants. In the 1990s the Historic Charleston Foundation began the Neighborhood Impact Initiative, using the goals of the revolving fund and rehabilitation to working-class neighborhoods.

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Greene, Nathaniel
August 25, 2014

“G” is for Greene, Nathanael [1742-1786]. Soldier. Early in the Revolution, Rhode Islander Nathaniel Greene became close to George Washington and served on his staff. After the battle of Camden, Washington personally selected him to command the southe rn army. Taking command in December 1780, he devised a strategy that led to the victory at Cowpens and caused Cornwallis to chase him to the Dan River. At Guilford Court House, Greene’s forces badly damaged the British who limped off to Virginia. Returning to South Carolina, he developed a strategy using his army and partisan raiders to capture isolated outposts one by one. During 1781, he forced the British into a small perimeter around Charleston. Simultaneously, Nathanael Greene aided in the restoration of civil government by protecting legislative meetings and restoring order in the interior in South Carolina.

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Charleston Renaissance
August 22, 2014

“C” is for Charleston Renaissance [ca. 1915-1940]. The Charleston Renaissance was a multifaceted cultural renewal. Artists, musicians, writers, historians, and preservationists—individually and in groups—fueled a revival that reshaped the city’s destiny. The Renaissance benefitted from a large number of books, many illustrated with paintings and prints by local artists. One story, more than any other, brought national attention to Charleston: the tale of Porgy by DuBose Heyward. It appeared first as a novel, then a play, and, in 1935, as the folk opera Porgy and Bess. Through words, melodies, pictures, and even a dance step, the idea of Charleston was broadcast to the nation. Although local residents realized that their city was undergoing a dramatic revitalization, the phrase “The Charleston Renaissance” did not get widespread usage until the 1980s.

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Blair, Frank
August 21, 2014

“B” is for Blair, Frank [1915-1995]. Broadcaster, author. A native of Yemassee, Blair served in the Navy during World War II. A deep-voiced broadcaster, a mainstay of NBC’s “The Today Show” from 1952 to 1975, he got his start in broadcasting at radio station WCSC in Charleston in 1935. After the war, Blair joined NBC and moderated “The American Forum of the Air,” a debate program. When the “Today Show” was launched in 1952, he was named Washington correspondent. During his 23 years on the show, he worked with 25 hosts. In his autobiography, Let’s Be Frank About It, he described the pressures of the job and his bouts with alcohol. Frank Blair resigned from the show in 1975 and retired to Hilton Head Island, but continued recording commercials and syndicated radio programs.

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Wilson, Charles Coker
August 20, 2014

“W” is for Wilson, Charles Coker [1864-1933]. Architect. After graduating from the South Carolina College with a degree in civil engineering, Wilson began his architectural career in Roanoke, VA.  By 1896 he was in Columbia and practiced in the firm of Wilson & Edwards. He was also Columbia’s city engineer and superintendent of the waterworks. Between 1904 and 1907 he made repairs to and rebuilt parts of the South Carolina State House. In 1914 he became the first 20th century South Carolinian to be named a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, after having been elected the South Carolina chapter’s charter president the previous year. Charles Wilson Coker was the first chairman of the South Carolina Board of Architectural Examiners from 1917 to 1933 and helped draft the state’s first building code.

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Senecca
August 19, 2014

“S” is for Seneca [Oconee County; population 7,652]. Founded in 1873, as Seneca City, the town took its name from an earlier Indian village and the nearby Seneca River. As was the case with several other upcountry towns, the arrival of the Atlanta and Charlotte Air Line Railroad was responsible for Seneca’s establishment. In 1874, the town was chartered by the General Assembly. Most trains stopped at Seneca, and it quickly became a commercial center, especially for marketing the area’s cotton. The economy was based on agriculture until cotton mills appeared at nearby villages, and they  drew their workers from the surrounding countryside. The Keowee Hotel had a fine reputation for food and hospitality among railroad passengers. From 1989 to 1939, Seneca was the site of the Seneca Institute, a well-known African American college.

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Robert Mills House
August 18, 2014

“R” is for Robert Mills House [Columbia]. A National Historic Landmark, Columbia’s Robert Mills House is most noted for its association with the first American-trained architect and the first federal architect of the United States. Ironically, the building’s architect was best known as the architect of public works such as courthouses and jails—not private residences. Of further significance is the building’s role as the home of a regionally important religious institution—Columbia Theological Seminary-- and as an example of the grassroots historic preservation movement of the 1960s. Following a seven-year campaign by the Historic Columbia Foundation for its restoration, the building opened to the public in 1967 as a historic house museum showcasing the neoclassical architecture and decorative arts of the early 19th century. The Robert Mills House exemplifies early 19th century classical revival design.

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Pinckney, Josephine Lyons Scott
August 15, 2014

“P” is for Pinckney, Josephine Lyons Scott [1895-1957]. Poet, novelist, civic leader. Pinckney played a key role in the literary revival that swept through the South after World War I. She was one of the founding members of the Poetry Society of South Carolina in 1920. During the following decade, she emerged as a poet of national reputation when her work, often evocative eulogies to a vanishing way of Southern life, appeared in influential journals such as the Saturday Review of Literature and Poetry. Pinckney participated in other aspects of the Charleston Renaissance through her dedicated involvement in such local cultural institutions as the Carolina Art Association, Charleston Museum, and the Dock Street Theatre. Josephine Lyons Scott Pinckney’s novel, Three O’clock Dinner appeared in 1945 and made her one of America’s best-known women fiction-writers.

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Medical Society of South Carolina
August 14, 2014

“M” is for the Medical Society of South Carolina. The fourth-oldest medical society in the United States, the Medical Society of South Carolina was founded in 1789 to “improve the Science of medicine, promoting liberality in the Profession, and Harmony among the Practitioners.” The Society founded the Medical College of South Carolina in 1823 with society members constituting six of the original seven faculty members. The Society quickly took a leading role in medical and public health issues. In 1790 it organized a dispensary for indigent patients that eventually merged with Roper Hospital. At the request of Charleston officials, the society formed a board of health and provided a port physician. The Medical Society of South Carolina provided leadership in the founding of the American Medical Association [1847] and the South Carolina Medical Association [1848].

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Lords Proprietors of South Carolina
August 13, 2014

“L” is for Lords Proprietors of Carolina. In 1663, King Charles II granted the land that became South and North Carolina to eight English noblemen: the Earl of Clarendon, the Duke of Albemarle, the Earl of Craven, the Earl of Shaftsbury, Baron Berkeley of Stratton,  and his brother Sir William Berkeley. Most of these men had been staunch supporters of the monarchy and were key figures in the king’s gaining the throne in 1660. South Carolina owes its formative beginnings to these shareholders and their joint colonial enterprise. Before the government of King George II bought out the last owners in 1729, nearly fifty individuals owned or claimed to own these eight shares. Only the Carteret, Colleton, and Craven shares remained in the hands of the families of the original Lords Proprietors of Carolina.

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Hispanics
August 12, 2014

“H” is for Hispanics. Hispanics are among South Carolina’s oldest and most recent immigrant groups. Long before English settlers landed at Jamestown, Spanish explorers laid claim to the territory in what is now the southeastern United States. In 1526, Spaniards established the first European settlement in present day South Carolina—and the US—at San Miguel de Gualdape. This settlement failed, but a later one, Santa Elena became the first capital of the Spanish colony of La Florida. It was abandoned in 1587. The term “Hispanic” and “Latino” apply to a broad category of persons of Latin American and/or Spanish descent. Tremendous diversity exists within these groups in terms of national origin, class, education, and other characteristics. In the 1990s, South Carolina was among eight states with the fastest-growing Hispanic population in the country.

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Green, Jonathan
August 11, 2014

“G” is for Jonathan Green [b. 1955]. Painter, print maker. Born in Gardens Corner in Beaufort County, Green served in the Air Force before enrolling as a textile design student at the East Grand Forks Technical School in Minnesota. In 1976 he began studying drawing and painting at the Art Institute of Chicago. Best known for depicting the people and landscape of the lowcountry, he refers to memories of local African American traditions, as well as tales and stories told by members of his extended family and friends. His paintings reflect an authentic historical understanding of lowcountry culture and communicate a strong sense of conceptual accuracy. Jonathan Green’s mature style conveys a narrative historicity, simplicity of form, and passionate energy that has been favorably compared with classically modern European artists such as Gauguin and Matisse.

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Lexington
August 08, 2014

Lexington

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Joseph Manigault House
August 07, 2014

Joseph Manigault House

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Hawks, Esther Hill
August 06, 2014

Hawks, Esther Hill

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Gilman, Samuel Foster
August 05, 2014

Gilman, Samuel Foster

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Fort Moultrie
August 04, 2014

Fort Moultrie

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Elmore, Franklin Harper
August 01, 2014

Elmore, Franklin Harper

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July 2014

Dickey, James
July 31, 2014

Dickey, James

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Carson, Jane Caroline Petigru
July 30, 2014

Carson, Jane Caroline Petigru

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Beaufort Gazette
July 29, 2014

Beaufort Gazette

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Anderson Independent Mail
July 28, 2014

Anderson Independent Mail

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Palmetto Bugs
July 25, 2014

Palmetto Bugs

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AME Zion Church
July 24, 2014

A.M.E. Zion Church

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United Textile Workers of America
July 23, 2014

United Textile Workers of America

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Tenantry
July 22, 2014

Tenantry

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St. John’s-Colleton Parish
July 21, 2014

St. John's-Colleton Parish

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Ravenel, Charles D.
July 18, 2014

Ravenel, Charles D.

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Oliphant, Mary C. Sims
July 17, 2014

Oliphant, Mary C. Sims

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National Guard
July 16, 2014

National Guard

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Malaria
July 15, 2014

Malaria

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Inter-Urbans
July 14, 2014

Inter-Urbans

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Baptists
July 11, 2014

Baptists

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Aiken
July 10, 2014

Aiken

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Washington, William
July 09, 2014

Washington, William

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University of South Carolina
July 08, 2014

University of South Carolina

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Textile Industry
July 07, 2014

Textile Industry

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Kirkland, Joseph Lane
July 04, 2014

Kirkland, Joseph Lane

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Jenkins Orphanage Band
July 03, 2014

Jenkins Orphanage Band

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Irby, John Laurens Manning
July 02, 2014

Irby, John Laurens Manning

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Hampton Plantation
July 01, 2014

Hampton Plantation

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June 2014

Geddings, Eli
June 30, 2014

Geddings, Eli

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Robert, Henry Martyn
June 27, 2014

“R” is for Robert, Henry Martyn [1837-1923]. Engineer, author. Born in South Carolina, Robert’s family moved to Ohio in 1851. After graduating from West Point in 1857, he began a forty-four year career with the Corps of Engineers, culminating as a brigadier general and chief of engineers, U.S. Army. He crossed the country working on federal construction and improvement projects involving river systems in Oregon, lighthouses on the Great Lakes, dams and locks on the Tennessee River, and the famous seawall constructed in Galveston after the great Hurricane of 1900. After years of presiding over public meetings, he published his notes on parliamentary procedure in 1876: Pocket Manual for Rules of Order for Deliberative Assemblies—better known as Robert’s Rules of Order. Henry Martyn Robert’s guide has never been out of print and remains the definitive voice of parliamentary procedure in meeting rooms worldwide.

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Pinckney Island Wildlife Refuge
June 26, 2014

“P” is for Pinckney Island Wildlife Refuge. Pinckney Island Wildlife Refuge is in Beaufort County, between Skull Creek and Mackay Creek. The Refuge was established in 1975 and opened in 1985. It is comprised of four islands: Corn, Little Harry, Big Harry, and Pinckney. The largest island, Pinckney, is the only one open to the public. From 1736 to 1936 the refuge was owned by the family and descendants of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney and was a cotton plantation. From 1937 until 1975, the island was managed as a game preserve. Nearly two-thirds of the refuge consists of salt marsh and tidal creeks. During spring and summer, the freshwater ponds host large concentrations of nesting ibis, herons, and egrets. Pinckney Island Wildlife Refuge provides hiking and biking trails excellent for wildlife observation and photography.

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Medal of Honor Recipients
June 25, 2014

“M” is for Medal of Honor Recipients. Approved by Congress in 1862, the Medal of Honor is America’s highest award for military valor. The first native son to receive the award was Ernest A. Garlington of Newberry for “distinguished gallantry” at the Battle of Wounded Knee in 1892. Eight South Carolinians were awarded the medal during World War I. During World War II, five Carolinians were awarded the medal. During the Korean War, three of the four men were presented the honor posthumously. Seven Carolinians were awarded the medal during America’s involvement in Vietnam, including the last medal presented during that conflict. All together, thirty native sons of South Carolina have been awarded the medal for “conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity” above that of their comrades in arms—one third of them made the supreme sacrifice.

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Longstreet, James Peter
June 24, 2014

“L” is for Longstreet, James Peter [1821-1904]. Soldier. Born in Edgefield District, Longstreet spent his formative years in Georgia and Alabama. After graduating from West Point, he had a successful army career, serving with distinction in the Mexican war and achieving the rank of major. In 1861, he resigned his US Army commission and joined the Confederate Army as a brigadier general. He distinguished himself as a superb military tactician and in 1862 Robert E. Lee made him his second in command. After Gettysburg he was transferred to the Western Theater where he won an impressive victory at Chickamauga. Returning to Virginia, he served brilliantly in the Battle at the Wilderness. After the war James Peter Longstreet settled in New Orleans and alienated many postwar southerners by joining the Republican Party.

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Hipp, Francis Moffett
June 23, 2014

“H” is for Hipp, Francis Moffett [1911-1995]. Insurance executive.  After graduating from Furman, Hipp joined his father’s company, Liberty Life Insurance. The Greenville-based firm also owned radio stations in Columbia and Charleston. When Hipp’s father died in 1943, the company’s directors elected him president and chairman of the board. An energetic leader, Hipp expanded the company into the Southeast through its own agents and nationally through financial institutions. In 1950, the Broadcasting Company of the South was formed for the company’s broadcasting entities—and, in 1953, launched its first television station. In 1967 the Liberty Corporation was created, with Liberty Life, Cosmos Broadcasting, and Surety Investments merged into it. As chairman of the State Development Board from 1959 to 1963, Francis Moffett Hipp was credited with major successes in recruiting new industry to South Carolina.

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Dunovant, John
June 20, 2014

“D” is for Dunovant, John [1825-1864]. Soldier. Dunovant, a sergeant in the Palmetto Regiment, served with distinction in the Mexican War. He later was commissioned as a captain in the US Army. He resigned his commission in 1861 and was appointed a major of South Carolina Volunteers. He was stationed in Charleston where he commanded Fort Moultrie. He was court-martialed for alleged drunkenness in 1862. He was returned to service in 1864 as colonel of the Fifth South Carolina Cavalry. The Fifth was transferred to the Army of Northern Virginia where it saw gritty fighting at Drewry’s Bluff, Cold Harbor, and Trevilian Station. In August 1864, he was elevated to the rank of temporary brigadier general. John Dunovant was killed in action October 1, 1864, during a cavalry charge near Petersburg, Virginia.

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Charleston Poorhouse and Hospital
June 19, 2014

“C” is for Charleston Poorhouse and Hospital. In 1768 the Commons House of Assembly authorized the building of a Poorhouse and Hospital to care for Charleston’s growing population of paupers. Envisioned as an advance in the humane treatment of the sick and uplift of the deserving poor, it was intended to serve as an infirmary for the physically and mentally ill and to provide shelter, food and reform for the needy. By the middle of the antebellum period it had devolved into a wretched dumping ground and haven of last resort for the city’s victims of poverty, alcoholism, and disease. In 1856, dismayed by the dreadful reputation of the Charleston Poorhouse and Hospital, city commissioners moved the facility into an abandoned factory on Columbus Street, renaming it the Alms House.

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Blackwood, Ibra Charles
June 18, 2014

“B” is for Blackwood, Ibra Charles [1878-1936]. Governor. After graduating from Wofford, Blackwood read law and was admitted to the bar. He represented Spartanburg in the General Assembly and served as solicitor of the Seventh Judicial Circuit. He made an unsuccessful bid for governor in 1926, but was elected in 1930. He entered office with the Great Depression well underway in South Carolina. In 1932, he joined Senator James F. Byrnes in endorsing Franklin Roosevelt for the presidency. Roosevelt’s victory brought an avalanche of New Deal assistance to the state, including the Agricultural Adjustment Act and the Civilian Conservation Corps. One of the most lasting of the New Deal projects was the massive Santee Cooper electrification project, which was secured through the extensive lobbying efforts of Senator Byrnes and Governor Ibra Charles Blackwood.

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Wilson, Robert
June 17, 2014

“W” is for Wilson, Robert [1867-1946]. Physician, educator. Wilson graduated from South Carolina College and obtained his medical degree from the Medical College of the State of South Carolina. After post-graduate work in New York, he joined the faculty of the Medical College of the State of South Carolina. He served the school for fifty-three years as, instructor in bacteriology, professor of medicine and nervous diseases, and head of the medicine department. In 1908 he became dean [president] and held the position until 1943. In 1913, with the cooperation of Governor Coleman L. Blease, he persuaded the General Assembly to assume ownership of the medical college and to provide financial support. Robert Wilson was physician in chief of Roper Hospital in Charleston for thirty years and chairman of the state Board of Health for twenty-eight.

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Selvy, Franklin Delano
June 16, 2014

“S” is for Selvy, Franklin Delano [b. 1932]. Basketball player. Born in Kentucky, Selvy played his college ball at Furman. He is best known for his high-scoring performances that made national headlines, including 100 points in a 149-95 victory over Newberry. Selvy led all college players in scoring for two seasons; was the first to average more than forty points per game in a single season; and the first to score more than 1,000 points in a single season. He was a three-time All-American and was the 1954 UPI Player of the Year. The number one overall professional draft pick in 1954, he played with the Baltimore Bullets, Saint Louis Hawks, and Los Angeles Lakers. After retiring from professional basketball, Franklin Delano Selvy was the head basketball coach for four seasons at his alma mater.

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Pickens, Andrew, Jr.
June 13, 2014

Pickens, Andrew, Jr. - Governor

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McKaine, Osceola Enoch
June 12, 2014

McKaine, Osceola Enoch

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Lockwood Greene
June 11, 2014

Lockwood Greene

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Heyward, Duncan Clinch
June 10, 2014

Heyward, Duncan Clinch - governor

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Governors
June 09, 2014

Governors

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Freeman, Grace Beacham
June 06, 2014

Freeman, Grace Beacham - poet.

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Dorchester County
June 05, 2014

Dorchester County

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Charlesfort
June 04, 2014

Charlesfort

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Beth Elohim
June 03, 2014

Beth Elohim - Charleston, SC

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Atwater, Harvey LeRoy
June 02, 2014

Atwater, Harvey LeRoy - political advisor

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May 2014

Jeremiah, Thomas
May 30, 2014

Jeremiah, Thomas

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Irish
May 29, 2014

Irish

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Hampton-Preston Mansion
May 28, 2014

Hampton-Preston Mansion

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Geiger, Emily
May 27, 2014

Geiger, Emily

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Fireproof Building
May 26, 2014

Fireproof Building, The

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Greeks
May 23, 2014

“G” is for Greeks. Greek immigrants began arriving in South Carolina at the turn of the 20th century, seeking to escape the economic stagnation of their own country. They quickly found a niche in urban areas as entrepreneurs within the service sector—starting out as pushcart merchants. Within a few years of arrival they were able to invest in storefront businesses such as confectionaries and restaurants. The Greek-owned restaurant became a common feature on the main street of many Carolina towns and cities. Greeks did not reside in ethnic enclaves and by the 1930s were well established in middle-class neighborhoods. The formation of permanent settlement resulted in the building of Greek Orthodox churches in the state’s major cities and towns. The church became the center of Greek cultural and religious life for immigrants and successive generations.

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Wilson, John Lyde
May 22, 2014

“W” is for Wilson, John Lyde [1784-1849]. Governor. From 1806 to 1822 Wilson served in both the South Carolina House and Senate. Elected governor in 1822, he proved to be an ardent advocate of states’ rights and promoted legislative resolutions denouncing federal authority. He was less diligent in maintaining the financial records of his office and was threatened with impeachment. In 1838 Wilson published Code of Honor: or Rules for the Government of Principals and Seconds in Duelling. Despite his assertions that the code would save lives, it required that any man refusing to fight be publicly labeled a coward. Code of Honor was so popular that it was reprinted in 158 and 1878. John Lyde Wilson wished that his code of honor would be employed by gentlemen “until the advent of the millennium.”

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Sellers, Cleveland Louis, Jr.
May 21, 2014

“S” is for Sellers, Cleveland Louis, Jr. [b. 1944]. Civil rights activist. Educator. Sellers attended Howard University where he met several student activists, including Stokely Carmichael—later chairman of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. In 1967 he returned to South Carolina and sought to organize students at the state’s historically black colleges—especially South Carolina State College in Orangeburg. Student demonstrations at a segregated bowling alley led to what has been termed the “Orangeburg Massacre.” Sellers was blamed for inciting a riot, indicted, convicted, and imprisoned. He later obtained graduate degrees from Harvard and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. In 1990 he joined the faculty of the University of South Carolina and became director of its African American Studies Program. In 2008, Cleveland Louis Sellers, Jr., became president of Vorhees College.

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Roads and Highways
May 20, 2014

“R” is for Roads and Highways. Until the War of 1812, South Carolina’s roads were secondary to water transportation. During the 1820s the legislature appropriated funds to build the State Road to connect Charleston with western North Carolina. The legislature enacted traffic regulation but left the construction and maintenance of roads to local road commissioners. The period from 1891 to 1911 was called the “era of good roads” as citizens lobbied for better roads. In 1922 federal highways and the first gasoline tax arrived. In 1956 construction began on the interstate highway system. Five interstates, 20, 26, 77, 85, and 95 cross the state. Funding for the state’s highways and roads has been a perennial challenge. Today, South Carolina’s Department of Transportation maintains one of the largest state highway systems in the nation.

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Pinckney, Henry Laurens
May 19, 2014

“P” is for Pinckney, Henry Laurens [1794-1863]. Legislator, congressman, editor. In 1816 Pinckney was elected to the South Carolina House where he served until 1828—and again from 1830-1832. He was chosen Speaker three times. As editor of the Charleston Mercury, he made the newspaper one of the most influential states’ rights and proslavery organs in the South. An ardent supporter of nullification, he was elected to the U.S. Congress in 1832. As a congressman, he introduced a series of bills—labeled the “gag rule”—that said Congress “ought not” to interfere with slavery in the District of Columbia and that abolitionist petitions to Congress should be tabled immediately without any discussion. Hard-line nullifiers and fire-eaters were irate at any suggestion that Congress could have any say about slavery and defeated Henry Laurens Pinckney’s bid for re-election.

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Means, John Hugh
May 16, 2014

“M” is for Means, John Hugh [1812-1862]. Governor. After graduating from South Carolina College, Means became a successful planter in Fairfield District. After one term in the General Assembly, he established himself as one of the leading fire-eaters in the upcountry and a vocal advocate of secession. He was elected governor in 1850. As governor, his administration set about to prepare the state for the possibility of secession and conflict with the federal government. He urged that the state’s military establishment be strengthened with the reorganization of the militia and the purchase of military materiel. He supported the use of state funds for railroad development. After one term, he retired to private life, but reemerged in 1860 to sign the Ordinance of Secession. During the Second Battle of Manassas, Colonel John Hugh Means was mortally wounded.

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Longstreet, Augustus Baldwin
May 15, 2014

“L” is for Longstreet, Augustus Baldwin [1790-1870]. Educator, author, clergyman, jurist. After graduating from Yale and studying law Longstreet returned to his native Georgia where he practiced law, served in the legislature, and was elected a judge. In 1835 he published Georgia Scenes a series of literary sketches of rural life in Georgia. The book was tremendously popular and is known as one of the best examples of southern backwoods humor. In 1839 he became president of Emory College in Oxford and later was president of the University of Mississippi. His publication, A Voice from the South, established his reputation as an ardent pro-slavery advocate. In 1856 he was elected president of South Carolina College. Augustus Baldwin Longstreet was not a strong teacher, preferring telling tall tales in his parlor to delivering learned lectures

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Hinton, James Miles
May 14, 2014

“H” is for Hinton, James Miles [1891-1970]. Clergyman, businessman, civil rights leader.  A native North Carolinian, Hinton began his business career in Augusta with the black-owned Pilgrim Health and Life Insurance Company. In 1939, he moved to Columbia and rapidly earned a reputation as a businessman and minister. He was elected president of the Columbia branch of the NAACP. In 1941 he became president of the state conference of the NAACP, a position he held until 1958. Under his leadership black teachers gained equal salaries with whites and black voters won the right to vote in the Democratic Primary. By the 1950s he was vocally opposing the doctrine that he said was “separate but never equal.” Because he dared openly to espouse racial equality, James Miles Hinton was abducted, beaten, and left face down in the countryside.

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Great Wagon Road, The
May 13, 2014

“G” is for the Great Wagon Road. The Great Wagon Road stretched for almost eight hundred miles from Philadelphia west to York and Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and thence south through Virginia into the Carolina backcountry. The road diverged in South Carolina, with one branch going toward Camden and another toward Ninety Six and the road’s southern terminus at Augusta. The road originated as an Indian trail—the “Warrior’s Path”--that, after 1744, developed into the Great Wagon Road. Thousands of Scots-Irish and German immigrants left Pennsylvania, traveling on foot, by horseback, and in Conestoga wagons. They rapidly populated the Carolina backcountry in the decades prior to the American Revolution. The Great Wagon Road was among the most heavily traveled in British North America, making it one of the most important frontier movement trails in American history.

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Executive Councils
May 12, 2014

“E” is for Executive Councils. After secession in December 1860, the state had to assume responsibilities previously carried out by the federal government. To do that, the Secession Convention established an Executive Council that met until April 1861. In January 1862, in response to the Union invasion of Port Royal, the reconvened Secession Convention created a new council to exercise executive authority. It consisted of the governor, the lieutenant governor, and three members elected by the Convention. This Council had a broad range of power to conduct affairs related to the war effort, including martial law, impressment, conscription, and war-materiel production. The Executive Council was effective, but engendered widespread opposition because of its extralegal nature and concentrated power. In December 1862, the General Assembly abolished the Executive Council and invalidated all its actions except fiscal contracts.

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Duke’s Mayonnaise
May 09, 2014

“D” is for Duke’s Mayonnaise. Duke’s mayonnaise is one of the South’s favorite condiments. Around 1917 Eugenia Duke mixed her first batch of mayonnaise in her Greenville home. Unlike similar commercial products, hers did not contain any sugar, nor did she whip egg whites as filler. And, thanks to her use of cider vinegar, her mayonnaise had a pleasing tartness. She started her business selling sandwiches to soda fountains and corner groceries. During World War I she expanded her enterprise to selling sandwiches to servicemen at nearby Fort Sevier. Soon soldiers from around the country wrote asking for jars of her specialty. Her business expanded rapidly and in 1923 she opened a manufacturing plant in Greenville. In 1929 Mrs. Duke sold her mayonnaise-manufacturing plant in Greenville and her prized recipe to the C.F. Sauer Company

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Charleston Orphan House
May 08, 2014

“C” is for the Charleston Orphan House. In 1790 the Charleston City Council established the Charleston Orphan House, the first public orphanage in America. At the turn of the 19th century, a magnificent building was erected at the corner of Boundary [now Calhoun] and St. Philip Streets. Some Orphan House alumni such as Christopher Memminger achieved fame, but the vast majority secured a relatively humane childhood that prepared them for productive work as adults. The landmark structure was demolished in the early 1950s for a department store. In 1951 all children in residence were moved to a facility at Oak Grove in North Charleston—which today is the Carolina Youth Development Center. Some five thousand children passed through the Charleston Orphan House over the century and a half of its operation downtown.

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Blackville
May 07, 2014

“B” is for Blackville [Barnwell County; population 2,973]. Incorporated in 1837, Blackville originated as a depository on the South Carolina Railroad. It was named for Alexander Black, a railroad superintendent. Prior to the Civil War, the town prospered as a cotton reception station, which stimulated the development of a bustling mercantile community. For a brief period after the war, Blackville was the Barnwell County seat. In the first half of the 20th century, truck farming fuelled the economy with large quantities of cucumbers, watermelons, and asparagus marketed in Blackville annually. However, by 1980, less than ten percent of the workforce in the area was in agriculture; the remainder were involved in manufacturing. In the early years of the 21st century, as the economy changed, Blackville struggled to maintain it position within Barnwell County.

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Williston
May 06, 2014

“W” is for Williston [Barnwell County, population 3,307]. Located on US Highway 78, the town is named for early settlers, the Willis family. In 1832, Elijah Willis, a local planter, donated land for a church, a post office, and a depot on the Charleston to Hamburg route of the new South Carolina Railroad. In the early 20th century, agriculture—primarily cotton and asparagus—formed the economic base for the community. In November 1950, the Atomic Energy Commission announced the coming of the Savannah River Site. The town’s population rose from 869 in 1950 to 10,000 or more during the peak years of the construction of “The Bomb Plant.” By 1960, population had declined to about 2,700, with many construction workers remaining in Williston to work for DuPont at the Savannah River Site.

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Seigler,Marie Samuella Cromer
May 05, 2014

“S” is for Seigler,Marie Samuella Cromer [1882-1964]. Educator. Girl’s club founder. In 1909, Seigler, an Abbeville County native, heard a representative of the US Department of Agriculture extol the virtue of the Boy’s Corn Clubs of America. This catalyzed her hopes of doing something to broaden the vision and self-confidence of rural girls. Within a few months she had founded the Aiken County Girls’ Tomato Club, the first such group in the nation, and was attracting favorable attention from government and philanthropic groups. By 1913 some twenty thousand girls in the southern states were participating. After marriage, Seigler moved into the background, but the movement continued to grow—and eventually evolved into the 4-H Clubs. In 1953, at the national 4-H Camp, President Eisenhower honored Marie Samuella Cromer Seigler for her role as a founder of 4-H.

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Rivers Bridge, Battle of
May 02, 2014

“R” is for Rivers Bridge, Battle of [February 2-3, 1865]. On February 2, 1865, the right wing of Sherman’s army attempted to cross the Salkehatchie River at Rivers Bridge—in what is now southern Bamberg County. A strongly-entrenched Confederate Brigade, commanded by Colonel George P. Harrison, repulsed a direct Union assault down the narrow causeway that spanned the thick Salkehatchie Swamp.  Other Union forces crossed the river downstream and out-flanked and attacked the Confederate defenders, forcing them to retreat. The battle cost each side about one hundred casualties and led to the cutting of the South Carolina Railroad. In 1876, men from nearby communities reburied the Confederate dead from the Battle of Rivers Bridge in a mass grave about a mile from the battlefield and began a tradition of annually commemorating the battle.

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Pinckney, Eliza Lucas
May 01, 2014

“P” is for Pinckney, Eliza Lucas [ca. 1722-1793]. Planter. Matriarch. Born in the West Indies, Eliza Lucas moved to South Carolina with her family in the 1730s. In 1739, her father returned to the West Indies, leaving her in charge of Wappoo Plantation. He instructed her to construct an indigo “works” at Wappoo. In the fifth year of experimentation, the plantation could make use of its own seed supply and produced a crop worthy of marketing. In 1744 she married Charles Pinckney. The couple had four children, including the future Founding Father Charles Cotesworth Pinckney and the future governor Thomas Pinckney. After Charles’s death in 1758, Eliza Lucas Pinckney readjusted to the role of directing plantations and spent increasingly more time with her daughter Harriott Horry’s family at Hampton Plantation on the Santee River.

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April 2014

McTyeire, Holland Nimmons
April 30, 2014

“M” is for McTyeire, Holland Nimmons [1824-1889]. Clergyman. Educated at Cokesbury Institute and Randolph-Macon College, McTyeire was ordained in 1848 and served churches in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. In 1851 he was one of the founders of the New Orleans Christian Advocate and in 1858, the editor of the Christian Advocate—the foremost publication in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. After the Civil War McTyeire was one of the leaders in reorganizing the denomination. In 1866, he was elected a bishop. He was a leader in establishing Central University—later Vanderbilt—and secured a $1 million gift from Cornelius Vanderbilt. He became the chief authority on the denomination’s government. Holland Nimmons McTyeire published a number of books, but is best remembered for, A History of Methodism, written to commemorate the centennial of American Methodism.

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Longshoreman’s Protective Union Association
April 29, 2014

“L” is for Longshoreman’s Protective Union Association. Chartered in 1869, the Longshoreman’s Protective Union Association [LPUA] established the legacy of a strong union presence, comprised almost entirely of African Americans, along Charleston’s docks. Their longevity, influence, and success marks Charleston longshoremen as perhaps the most prominent exception to South Carolina’s long tradition of anti-unionism. The decline of the port of Charleston in the late 19th century led to a decline in the LPUA. The union’s charter was not renewed in 1900, but in 1936 Charleston longshoremen organized Local 1422 of the International Longshoremen’s Association. At the beginning of the 21st century, ILA Local 1422 was measured among the most efficient port labor forces in the world, and for a South Carolina labor union, enjoyed unusually broad support among local politicians and business leaders.

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Hines, John Elbridge
April 28, 2014

“H” is for Hines, John Elbridge [1910-1997]. Clergyman. Civil Rights advocate.  A native of Seneca, Hines graduated from Sewanee and Virginia Theological Seminary. After being ordained an Episcopal priest, he served churches in St. Louis, Augusta, and Houston. In 1945 he was consecrated bishop coadjutor of Texas and in 1955 became the fourth bishop of Texas. He was elected Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church in 1964. Hines was committed to racial and social justice and led the Episcopal Church into an era of social activism in the 1960s. He also was a leader of the ecumenical movement and supported the National Council of Churches of Christ in the United States and the Consultation on Church Union. John Elbridge Hines is the only native South Carolinian to serve as presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church.

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McSweeney, Miles Benjamin
April 25, 2014

“M” is for McSweeney, Miles Benjamin [1855-1909]. Governor. After serving as co-publisher of a newspaper in Ninety Six, McSweeney moved to Hampton and founded the Hampton County Guardian. He became an active member of the South Carolina Press Association and served as its president. An influential member of the Democratic Party in Hampton County, in 1894 he was elected to the South Carolina House of Representatives. Two years later he was elected lieutenant governor. He was reelected in 1898; following the death of Governor William H. Ellerbe, McSweeney became governor. With the support of U.S. Senator Benjamin Tillman, McSweeney was elected to a full term as governor in 1900. Constitutionally ineligible to serve another term, he left office in 1903 and returned to private life in Hampton. Miles Benjamin McSweeney remained active in Democratic Party politics, but never held another public office.

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Long, William Williams
April 24, 2014

“L” is for Long, William Williams [1861-1934]. Agriculturalist. A native North Carolinian, Long worked his family farm before joining the US Department of Agriculture’s Bureau of Plant Industry. He then served as a field agent in the South Atlantic states for the Farmers Cooperative Demonstration Work. In 1913 Clemson College asked him to reorganize the Extension Service in South Carolina. He stayed on as Director when in 1915 the General Assembly named Clemson as the Extension Service agent under the provisions of the Smith-Lever Act of 1914. Long served as director for the remainder of his life. Through the Extension Service, he helped improve crop production, the livestock industry, commodity marketing, rural cooperation, and the social life of rural South Carolina. Long Agricultural Hall on the Clemson campus and W.W. Long 4-H Leadership Center in Aiken County bear the name of William Williams Long.

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Hilton Head Island
April 23, 2014

“H” is for Hilton Head Island [Beaufort County; population 33,862]. Located in the southeast corner of the state, Hilton Head Island is the largest of the islands that flank South Carolina’s Atlantic coast. Prior to the Civil War, Hilton Head planters grew rich off the production of sea island cotton. During the war, the island was occupied by Union forces—and after the war, much of the island reverted to nature. In the 1960s, Charles Fraser and his Sea Pines Company developed Sea Pines Plantation, an oasis of taste and natural beauty amid the hodgepodge that characterized much of the Atlantic coast. Hilton Head Company and other developers followed Fraser’s lead with resort hotels and gated communities.  Many of the islands black residents, however, remained on the bottom of the economic ladder. Hilton Head Island is named English explorer, William Hilton.

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Grayson, William John
April 22, 2014

“G” is for Grayson, William John [1788-1863]. Politician, planter, poet. Grayson spent much of his youth on Parris Island, the inspiration for his later pastoral verse. He graduated at the top of his class from the South Carolina College in 1809. He had several plantations on the Wando River and owned 170 slaves. He held numerous public offices, serving in both the South Carolina House and Senate, the US House of Representatives and as Charleston’s Collector of Customs. Grayson is best remembered for his pro-slavery verse, The Hireling and the Slave, a rejoinder [structured in heroic couplets] to the depiction of slavery in Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Grayson found abhorrent the wage labor systems of England and the North, characterizing them as an even greater injustice than slavery. However, William John Grayson also a Unionist and vigorously defended the principles of America’s founders.

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Furman University
April 21, 2014

“F” is for Furman University. In 1825, the South Carolina Baptist Convention elected a board to organize an institution to train young men for the ministry. The school opened in Edgefield in 1827 and was named in honor of Richard Furman. After several decades of difficulty and relocations, Furman moved to Greenville in 1850. The institution had a college preparatory department, a collegiate department, and a theological department. The theological department separated in 1859 and became Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and the preparatory department was discontinued in 1916. In 1950, Furman’s trustees purchased 900 acres for a new campus, six miles north of Greenville. The new campus opened in 1958 and the move from downtown was completed in 1961. In 1990, the trustees of Furman University voted to sever all ties with the South Carolina Baptist Convention, a decision the Convention recognized in 1992.

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Bishopville
April 18, 2014

Bishopville

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Williamsburg County
April 17, 2014

Williamsburg County

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Tiger River
April 16, 2014

Tiger River

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Secession Crisis of 1850-51
April 15, 2014

Secession Crisis of 1850-51

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Riverbanks Zoo and Garden
April 14, 2014

Riverbanks Zoo and Garden

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Piedmont
April 11, 2014

Piedmont

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McLeod, Thomas Gordon
April 10, 2014

McLeod, Thomas Gordon

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Local Government
April 09, 2014

Local Government

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High Hills of the Santee
April 08, 2014

High Hills of the Santee

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Granby
April 07, 2014

Granby

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Everett, Percival
April 04, 2014

“E” is for Everett, Percival [b. 1956]. Everett grew up in Columbia. He drew on his experiences as a young African American growing up in Columbia in his first novel, Suder. The critical success of Suder led to teaching appointments at Kentucky, Notre Dame, and, the University of Southern California. Though some of his fiction draws at least partly on Southern origins and themes, Everett’s creative work is more generally focused on the American West--or more imagined settings.  With Ralph Ellison, he shares an abiding interest in European and African myth as well as a staunch refusal to limit African American fiction to mere “protest writing.” In addition to his writing and teaching, Percival Everett has long served as editor of the distinguished literary journal Callaloo, which publishes critical studies of and original works by black writers from around the world.

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Dubose, William Porcher
April 03, 2014

“D” is for DuBose, William Porcher [1836-1918]. Professor, theologian.  DuBose studied for the ordained ministry at the Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of South Carolina at Camden. He served as adjutant in the Confederate army, and after his ordination as a deacon, a chaplain. He was ordained a priest in 1866. From 1871 to 1883 he was chaplain of the University of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee where he helped establish the School of Theology and, from 1894 to 1908, was its dean. DuBose He published seven books--five were studies of the New Testament. His theology was rooted in the first seven ecumenical councils, which defined Jesus Christ as fully human, fully divine, in one person. William Porcher DuBose was a leading theologian in the Episcopal Church and an internationally recognized theologian of the New Testament.

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Charleston Musuem
April 02, 2014

“C” is for Charleston Museum. Founded in 1773, the museum originated as an auxiliary of the Charleston Library Society, dedicated to the collection, preservation, and study of “materials promoting a Natural History” of South Carolina. Thomas Heyward. Jr., and Charles Cotesworth Pinckney were among its early curators. The museum secured its first independent home and autonomy in 1907 when it moved to the Thompson Auditorium. Innovative directors, including Laura Bragg, the first female museum director in the country, expanded the size and variety of the museum collections, published scientific and archaeological studies, and inaugurated ambitious public education programs. In 1980, the museum moved to a new building at 360 Meeting Street. For the very first time, the collections were housed in a facility that had been designed as a museum. The Charleston Museum is the oldest municipal museum in the United States.

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“Black” Seventh District
April 01, 2014

“B” is for the “Black” Seventh District. After the 1880 census, South Carolina was awarded an additional two seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. Redistricting gave the state’s white Democrats an opportunity to neutralize black Republican voting strength. Congressman Samuel Dibble of Orangeburg drafted a plan to pack as many black voters as possible into one district so that white Democrats could win the remaining six seats. The proposed seventh or black district snaked across the state and included portions of nine different counties. It stretched from the Savannah River to Winyah Bay [excluding the city of Charleston] and from the Atlantic to the Sandhills, nearly one hundred miles inland. More than 81 percent of the district’s voters were African American. In 1896, Republican George Washington Murray was the last African American Congressman elected from the “Black” Seventh District of South Carolina.

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March 2014

Williamston
March 31, 2014

“W” is for Williamston [Anderson County; population 3,791]. Around 1842 West Allen Williams discovered a mineral spring on his property that gave rise to the town named for him. Stories of the spring’s healing properties attracted people to try its waters. By 1850, a small village had grown up around the spring and it had a post office. Originally called Mineral Spring, the village was incorporated as Williamston in 1852. With railroad connections to Greenville and Columbia, Williamston seemed well on the way to becoming a popular resort until an 1860 fire leveled several hotels and much of the business district. One of the last skirmishes of the Civil War took place near the village in May 1865. The original spring is now a part of Williamston State Park where visitors can still take a sip of mineral water.

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Self, James Cuthbert
March 28, 2014

“S” is for Self, James Cuthbert [1876-1955]. Textile manufacturer, philanthropist. A native of Bowles Mountain in Edgefield County [now Greenwood County], Self attended a business college in Virginia and in 1899 became a bookkeeper in the Bank of Greenwood. In 1908 he became president and treasurer of Greenwood Cotton Mill. When Self became president, the mill had obsolete equipment and was mired in debt. He purchased new looms on credit, hired skilled associates, and improved working and living conditions for employees. Over the next twenty years, he opened or purchased three more mills. In 1935, with his mills operating on three shifts a day, Self purchased all outstanding stock and became sole owner of Greenwood Cotton Mill. In 1942 James Cuthbert Self created the private Self Foundation that today continues to provide grants to improve the quality of life in Greenwood and South Carolina.

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Rivers, Lucius Mendel
March 27, 2014

“R” is for Rivers, Lucius Mendel [1905-1970]. Congressman. Rivers successfully passed the bar exam by reading law. In 1933 he was elected to the South Carolina House of Representatives and served until 1936 when he went to work for the U.S. Department of Justice. In 1940 he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives and was re-elected fifteen times with only minor opposition. He was appointed to the Naval Affairs Committee, headed by Carl Vinson of Georgia. In Congress, Rivers developed a career as a staunch supporter of national defense, increased military spending, and the establishment of a nuclear navy. During his years in Congress, the First Congressional District was a major benefactor of military spending. Following Vinson’s retirement in 1965, Lucius Mendel Rivers became the chairman of the powerful House Armed Services Committee, a position he held until his death.

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Pinckney, Charles
March 26, 2014

"P" is for Pinckney, Charles [1757-1784]. Planter, legislator, governor, statesman. In 1779, Pinckney began his public service as a member of the General Assembly. During the Revolution he participated in the siege of Savannah and was captured at the fall of Charleston. In 1784, he re-entered the General Assembly and was elected to the Confederation Congress. In 1787 Pinckney was one of South Carolina's delegates to the Constitutional Convention. In Philadelphia he presented what is called the "Pinckney Draft," a proposal calling for a strong central government consisting of three "separate and distinct" branches. He was elected governor—the first of four times—in 1789. From 1801to 1805, he served as minister plenipotentiary to Spain. Charles Pinckney retired from public life in 1814, but when called upon in 1819, he was elected and served one term in the U.S. House of Representatives.

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McNair, Ronald Erwin
March 25, 2014

“M” is for McNair, Ronald Erwin [1950-1986]. Astronaut. As a young child in Lake City, McNair had a keen interest in science. After graduating from North Carolina Agricultural and State technical University, he received his Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. While at MIT, he had conducted significant work in laser technology. Upon graduation he became a staff physicist at Hughes Research Laboratory where he continued his laser research. His work attracted the attention of NASA and in 1978 McNair was selected as an astronaut candidate. The second African American in space, he made his first flight in February 1984 aboard the space shuttle Challenger.  He was slated to undertake his second shuttle mission in January 1986. Tragically, the Challenger exploded shortly after its launch on January 28, 1986, killing Ronald Erwin McNair and his six fellow crewmembers.

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Hill, Daniel Harvey
March 24, 2014

"H" is for Hill, Daniel Harvey [1821-1889]. Soldier. After graduating from West Point, Hill served in a series of battles in the Mexican War. When the Civil War began he was given command of the First Regiment of North Carolina Volunteers and led his men to victory at Big Bethel Church, the first land battle of the war. Promoted to major general, he participated in the Seven Days campaign and showed great bravery under fire. At Sharpsburg his division lost more than sixty percent of its men and he had three horses shot from under him. In the Army of the Tennessee, at Chickamauga, he again proved his skill and bravery, but he and some of his fellow officers complained about the conduct of General Braxton Bragg. President Jefferson Davis personally intervened, supported Bragg, and relieved Daniel Harvey Hill from duty.

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Londonborough Township
March 21, 2014

“L” is for Londonborough Township. At times referred to as Belfast and Londonderry, the 22,000-acre Londonborough Township was laid our on Hard labor Creek in 1762. Originally designed to provide a buffer between the Cherokees and lowcountry plantations, it was primarily populated by poor Palatine German Protestants who had been living in England. Johann Heinrich Christian von Stümpel, a “too hopeful immigration agent”, had recruited the settlers. Sponsored by a group of London philanthropists, granted land, and provisioned by the colonial government, these Germans began to arrive in the colony in 1764. Subsequent groups followed and by 1765, some 250 Germans were living in the township. Attempts to grow hemp failed. Mindful of their debt to their benefactors, many of the settlers in Londonborough Township sided with the British and left South Carolina at the conclusion of the war.

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Hillsborough Township
March 20, 2014

“H” is for Hillsborough Township. Located on the upper Savannah River in present-day McCormick County, Hillsborough Township was named after Wills Hill, viscount of Hillsborough and president of the British Board of Trade.  The settlement originated with a letter the Reverend Jean-Louis Gibert addressed to the Board of Trade in 1763 regarding a project to settle Huguenots in North America. His plan coincided with the desire of South Carolina’s government to strengthen the colony’s western frontier after the Cherokee War. In 1764 Gibert’s colonization scheme was approved and he received a 23,000-acre land grant. About 300 Huguenots and a few Swiss and Germans arrived and built a town, New Bordeaux. Plans to cultivate wine and produce silk failed and by 1770 the town was largely abandoned. Although some settlers remained in then area the grand plan for Hillsborough Township was unsuccessful.

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Gray, Wil Lou
March 19, 2014

“G” is for Gray, Wil Lou [1883-1984]. Educator, public servant. Gray was a native of Laurens where her family were influential civic leaders, devoted Methodists, and contributors to the economic development of the own. After graduating from Columbia College in 1903, she accepted a teaching position in a one-room schoolhouse in Greenwood County. This experience opened her eyes to the poverty, illiteracy, and public indifference to the problems in the South, and inspired her to pursue graduate work at Vanderbilt and Columbia universities. In 1915 Gray opened an adult night school in Laurens County. From this humble beginning she emerged as a leader in adult education. From 1921 to 1946 she served as the South Carolina Supervisor of Adult Education. While Supervisor, Will Lou Gray experimented with night schools, summertime lay-by schools, and adult-oriented educational camps called “opportunity schools” for which she is renowned.

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Furman, Richard
March 18, 2014

“F” is for Furman, Richard [1755-1825]. Minister, educator. In 1770 Furman’s family moved from New York to the High Hills of the Santee. Under the influence of a local minister Furman abandoned his Anglican upbringing and embraced the evangelistic Calvinism of Separate Baptists.  He was ordained in 1774 and served churches in the High Hills and Charleston. Furman had a tremendous impact on the development of the Baptist denomination.  He stressed the importance of an educated ministry and influenced the development of a number of church-related institutions of higher education, including Mercer, Furman, and the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He was twice elected president of the Triennial Baptist Convention, a national organization of Baptists based in Philadelphia. Richard Furman was also a founder and president of the South Carolina Baptist Convention, the first statewide Baptist organization in the United States.

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Evans, Matilda Arabella
March 17, 2014

“E” is for Evans, Matilda Arabella [1872-1935]. Physician. A native of Aiken, Evans attended Schofield Normal and Industrial School, Oberlin College’s preparatory school, and the Women’s Medical College in Philadelphia. Aware of the inadequate health care available for black Carolinians, she decided to improve medical care and sanitation in her home state. Evans became the first female physician in Columbia. She treated both black and white patients in her home. By 1901 she had become superintendent of the Taylor Lane Hospital and Training School for Nurses, Columbia’s first black hospital. Patients came from as far away as Georgia and North Carolina. Focusing on preventive medicine, Evans established the Negro Health Care Association of South Carolina with a goal of placing a black nurse in each county. Matilda Arabella Evans’s walk-in clinics and hospital were the first available for many blacks in the Deep South.

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Drovers
March 14, 2014

“D” is for Drovers. From around 1800 until the 1880s, livestock from Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and North Carolina were driven through Greenville County to the seaport at Charleston—destined for markets in the north and in the Caribbean. These drives were made possible by the completion of a road from Greenville County across the mountains into Knoxville, Tennessee in the late 1790s. Herds consisted primarily of cattle or hogs, but also included sheep, mules, horses, and turkeys.  A typical cattle drive consisted of 100-120 head of cattle attended by three drovers: one on horseback and two on foot. Drovers became expert whip-crackers, and the term “crackers” may have derived from the whips they used. The expansion of railroads into the upcountry and across the mountains, coupled with the gradual decline in open-range grazing, led to the demise of the droving trade.

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Charleston Mercury
March 13, 2014

“C” is for the Charleston Mercury. Although begun as a literary journal, the Charleston Mercury developed into one of the state’s most radical and combative newspapers. In 1821 a local bookseller established the paper, but in 1823 sold it to Henry Laurens Pinckney who transformed it into a partisan organ for John C. Calhoun. By 1830, the Mercury had become a strong proponent of nullification. Although its ownership changed several times in the 1840s and 1850s, its editorial tone remained aggressive. In 1857 the Rhett family purchased the newspaper and Robert Barnwell Rhett, Jr. assumed complete control. The Mercury called loudly for secession. When that was achieved, the paper turned it attention to criticizing the Confederate government. The newspaper’s press was moved to Columbia where it was destroyed in February 1865. After the war, Rhett restarted the Charleston Mercury, but it failed in 1868.

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Black River
March 12, 2014

“B” is for Black River. The Black River takes its name from its tea-colored waters. The river begins in the Sandhills of Lee County, and is joined at Rocky Bluff Swamp near Sumter. The Pocotaligo River flows into the Black between Manning and Kingstree.  In some places the river is swamp like, while in others it is swift moving with a sandy bottom. After travelling over 150 miles through four counties, the Black River becomes part of the Great Pee Dee River near Georgetown. With the exception of the town of Kingstree and the final stretch in Georgetown County, the banks of the river remain forested and largely undisturbed by development. Today the Black River Basin is primarily a resource for timbering, hunting, and fishing. In 2001 seventy-five miles of the Black River in Clarendon, Williamsburg, and Georgetown Counties became a state scenic river.

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Williamson’s Plantation, Battle of
March 11, 2014

“W” is for Williamson’s Plantation, Battle of [July 12, 1780]. After the fall of Charleston, New Acquisition District in present-day York County was reputedly the only district where no one took the King’s protections. Patriot raids on British outposts led to a detachment of the British Legion, under the command of Captain Christian Huck, being sent to punish the rebels. He responded vigorously by insulting the inhabitants and pillaging the countryside. On the night of July 11th he camped at James Williamson’s abandoned plantation in Brattonsville. A patriot force of 133 gathered and resolved to attack the enemy at first light. Caught by surprise, Huck’s command of 120 men offered little resistance. Huck was killed, as were most of his men. Popularly known as Huck’s Defeat, the Battle of Williamson’s Plantation was the first significant check on the British advance since their victory at Charleston.

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Segregation
March 10, 2014

“S” is for Segregation.  Segregation, the residential, political, and social isolation of African Americans, by law and custom was accomplished in South Carolina in the last quarter of the 19th century. The 1895 constitution effectively disenfranchised most black Carolinians. Jim Crow laws were speedily enacted after the US Supreme Court’s decision in Plessy v. Ferguson that established the principle of separate but equal. For black Carolinians, the experience of life in a segregated society was often traumatic. A wide variety of laws set African Americans apart from whites. Blacks sat in balconies in movie theaters, drank from separate water fountains, waited for trains in separate waiting rooms, and sat in the back of buses. The legal proscriptions of segregation were generally accompanied by a socially enforced system of etiquette, which was felt in intensely personal and painful ways by black Carolinians.

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Erosion
March 07, 2014

Erosion

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Donaldson, John Owen
March 06, 2014

Donaldson, John Owen

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Chamberlain, Edward Burnham
March 05, 2014

Chamberlain, Edward Burnham

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Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church
March 04, 2014

Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church

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Wild Turkey
March 03, 2014

Wild Turkey

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February 2014

Rivers, John Minott
February 28, 2014

“R” is for Rivers, John Minott [1903—1988]. Broadcasting executive. After college, Rivers, a native of Charleston, moved to Greenville. There he became friends with the president of the Liberty Life Insurance Company that operated WCSC radio in Charleston. In 1938 he became president of South Carolina Broadcasting Company, which operated WCSC. He later purchased the station. In 1948 he began operation of an FM station. In 1953, he put WCSC-TV, South Carolina’s first VHF television station on the air. Rivers’ company, WCSC, Inc., eventually became involved in long distance and cellular telephones, security systems, and other enterprises. He helped found the South Carolina Association of Broadcasters in 1952 and served as its president. From 1966 to 1982 he was a member of the South Carolina Educational Television Commission. In 1974 John Minott Rivers was inducted into the Broadcasters Hall of Fame

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Pike, John Martin
February 27, 2014

“P” is for Pike, John Martin [1840-1932]. Clergyman, editor, publisher. A Canadian and ordained Methodist clergyman, Pike was invited to preach at Columbia’s Washington Street Methodist Church. He subsequently moved to the state and served churches in in Lynchburg, Sumter, Summerville, and Charleston. In 1893 he became editor of a periodical, The Way of Faith. Through his involvement with the Oliver Gospel Mission in Columbia, Pike became a pivotal figure in the spread of Holiness and Pentecostal strains of Protestantism in South Carolina.  After Pentecostal revivals in Los Angeles in 1906, Pike and The Way of Faith became major conduits in publicizing the new movement throughout the South. In his later years, John Martin Pike added a significant social component to his work in Columbia, founding the Door of Hope, a ministry for women victimized by sexual predators, poverty, and domestic violence.

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McNair, Robert Evander
February 26, 2014

“M” is for McNair, Robert Evander [1923-2007]. Attorney, legislator, governor. During World War II, McNair served 23 months in the Pacific theater. After the war, he graduated from USC and moved to Allendale—the hometown of his wife, Josephine. From 1951 until 1963 he represented Allendale County in the South Carolina House of Representatives. In 1962 he was elected lieutenant governor. When Governor Donald Russell resigned in April 1965, McNair became governor. He was elected to a full term in 1966. The McNair administration coincided with major civil rights initiatives and significant protests and demonstrations. Except for the tragedy at Orangeburg and the incident at Lamar, he saw the state peacefully through difficult times—and guided it through the first year of total desegregation of the public school system. After leaving the governorship in 1971, Robert Evander McNair never held any other public office.

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Loggerhead Turtle
February 25, 2014

“L” is for Loggerhead Turtle. State Reptile.  The loggerhead turtle, a threatened species, is one of the world’s eight living species of turtles and evolved some sixty-five million to seventy million years ago. At birth, hatchlings are about two inches long. Adults can weight between 200 and250 pounds. The animal is reddish brown and yellow and has a distinctive large head—the source of its name--with powerful jaws enabling it to crush clams, crustaceans, and other food. Its great size and hard shell protect adult turtles from most predators. Adult loggerheads in the western Atlantic range from Newfoundland to Argentina, but they nest in temperate zones. Breeding occurs in the ocean and, and females lay their eggs between May and September. South Carolina beaches are favorite nesting grounds. The loggerhead turtle [Caretta caretta] was named the state reptile on June 1, 1988.

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Highway 301
February 24, 2014

“H” is for Highway 301. Construction of this major US highway in South Carolina began in 1932, when the federal government began taking over the maintenance and construction of many state roads. The route began in Baltimore, Maryland and ended in Sarasota, Florida—crossing through many towns in eastern South Carolina: including Dillon, Latta, Florence, Manning, Olanta, Sumerton, Bamberg, and Allendale. From the North Carolina border to the Savannah River, Highway 301 covers a distance of approximately 180 miles. Popular with tourists, the highway had many nicknames including, the “Tobacco Trail,” “Highway of Southern Hospitality,” and “Shortest Route from Maine to Florida.” The route was popular because it avoided some larger cities, had no toll bridges or ferries, and was paved for its entire length.  The building if I-95 in the 1950s and 1960s led to a dramatic decline in tourist traffic on Highway 301.

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Grave-site decoration
February 21, 2014

“G” is for Grave-site decoration. West Africans transported to South Carolina as slaves had their own belief system regarding death, burial, and the power of the living and the dead. Shiny or reflective materials like mirrors, silver painted objects and tin foil may have represented the desire to steer the spirit on a smooth passage over a body of water. Medicine bottles, dishes, and eating utensils—sometimes turned upside down and broken to possibly free the spirit and break the chain of death. Kerosene lanterns and lamps were sometimes placed to light the way of the spirit back home. Seashells were widely used on coastal burial sites in complex patterns—perhaps to confuse malevolent spirits. Although African American burial traditions have undergone a tremendous evolution, there still remains a subtle manifestation of African heritage in African American burial, mourning, and grave-site decoration practices.

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Furchgott, Robert Francis
February 20, 2014

“F” is for Furchgott, Robert Francis [1916-2009]. Pharmacologist. Nobel Prize Laureate. When he was a young boy growing up in Orangeburg, Furchgott’s first interest was natural history. After graduating from the University of North Carolina, he obtained a PhD in biochemistry from Northwestern University. He served on the medical faculties of Cornell, Washington University in St. Louis, State University of New York in Brooklyn, Miami University, and the Medical University of South Carolina. Furchgott became known for his research in cardiac pharmacology, the theory of drug-receptor mechanisms, and vascular pharmacology and physiology. His research has had profound implications for the treatment of cardiovascular conditions and other diseases. In 1998 Robert Francis Furchgott and two others were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries concerning nitric oxide as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system.

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Evans, Josiah James
February 19, 2014

“E” is for Evans, Josiah James [1786-1858]. Jurist. U.S. Senator. In 1812 Evans was elected to the South Carolina House of Representatives from Marlboro District and in 1816 was elected solicitor for the Northern Circuit. From 1829 1852, the legislature regularly elected him to serve as judge on several state courts. While a judge he authored Road Law, a digest of South Carolina law. However, his legal reputation rests with his being lead counsel in successfully defending the estate of Mason Lee against challenges by Lee’s relatives. The case is one of the most legendary in South Carolina legal history. In 1852, the General Assembly elected Evans to the U.S. Senate. Although a supporter of states’ rights and strong defender of his native state against the virulent attacks of Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner, Josiah James Evans did not support disunion.

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Drayton Hall
February 18, 2014

“D” is for Drayton Hall [Charleston County]. Established in 1738, Drayton Hall is a historic plantation located between the Ashley River and Ashley River road—about nine miles from Charleston. At the time of its construction, its two-story brick main house with raised basement reflected current English Georgian architecture and was inspired by the designs of Italian renaissance architect Andrea Palladio. John Drayton founded Drayton Hall and it remained in possession of the Drayton family for seven generations. In 1974 the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the state of South Carolina, and the Historic Charleston Foundation acquired Drayton Hall from the Draytons. They chose to preserve the site “as is” rather than restore or reconstruct the house to an earlier or specific time period. Drayton Hall is one of the oldest unrestored plantation houses in America that is open to the public.

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Charleston Library Society
February 17, 2014

“C” is for Charleston Library Society. The Charleston Library Society is the third-oldest institutional library in the United States. Established as a private, subscription library in 1748, it received a charter of incorporation in 1755. By 1778, the society’s book and periodical book collection numbered five thousand volumes. Society members promoted the idea of a colonial college and started a natural science collection that evolved into the Charleston Museum. The Charleston fire of 1778 destroyed all but a handful of the library’s books. In 1863, the librarian sent one-half of the books to Columbia for safe-keeping, but they were destroyed there in 1865. Among the library’s collection are books, audio and video collections, pamphlets, and manuscripts. The most significant collection is its newspaper files, which contain the world’s largest and most complete collection of 18th and 19th century Charleston newspapers.

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Black Codes
February 14, 2014

“B” is for Black Codes [1865-1866]. In 1865, with little direction forthcoming from Washington, the states of the former Confederacy drew up “Black Codes” to clarify the standing of African Americans. In December 1865, the General Assembly adopted South Carolina’s “Black Codes.” There were three main laws with extensive articles. The first recognized the abolition of slavery and defined “black” for the first time in the state’s legal code. The second set forth restrictions that actually curtailed rights enjoyed by free persons of color prior to the war. The third section concentrated on the labor question. African Americans could only work as field hands or hired servants—any other occupation required a license from a judge. The Black Codes were an attempt to re-create, within the confines of an altered federal Constitution, as much of the antebellum South as possible.

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Williamson, Andrew
February 13, 2014

“W” is for Williamson, Andrew [ca. 1730-1786]. Soldier. Williamson immigrated to Ninety Six District from his native Scotland. He was a lieutenant during the Cherokee War. An ardent patriot at the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, Williamson represented Ninety Six District in the First and Second Provincial Congresses. In November 1775 he commanded a patriot force defending Ninety Six and later hunted down Tories during the Snow Campaign. Promoted to colonel, he led South Carolina troops in a punitive expedition against Native Americans on the frontier. The campaign subdued the Cherokees who signed a treaty at DeWitt’s Corner. After the fall of Charleston, he accepted British protection and moved to the port city. During the British occupation of Charleston, he served as a double agent for Continental forces. Because of this, Andrew Williamson was allowed to remain in the state after the Revolution.

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Tynte, Edward
February 12, 2014

“T” is for Tynte, Edward [d. 1710]. Governor. Tynte was from a Somerset, England family that had recently risen to a baronetcy. Surviving English documents refer to him variously as major or colonel. In a Latin poem expressing high hopes for Tynte’s administration, a Tory writer implied that Tynte was also a man of culture. Frustrated by nearly a decade of factionalism in Carolina, the proprietors decided to institute a wholesale change of government and began by commissioning Tynte as the new governor in December 1708. After almost a year’s delay, he arrived in Charleston and was proclaimed governor in November 1709. Unfortunately, Tynte had little opportunity to realize the proprietors’ ambitions. He died on June 26, 1710, after only seven months in office. By the terms of his will, Edward Tynte left his entire estate to Frances Killner, spinster of London.

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Secessionville, Battle of (June 16, 1862)
February 11, 2014

“S” is for Secessionville, Battle of [June 16, 1862). Union general Henry Benham launched an assault on Tower Battery near the planter village of Secessionville. The Confederate defenders, supported by the timely arrival of reinforcements, threw back the Union troops in fierce hand-to-hand fighting. A second Northern wave crashed against the battery’s left flank, but again was repulsed. Unbeknownst to the Northerners, the battery stood at the choke point of a telescoping peninsula. The marshy ground forces the Federal attackers into the mouths of Confederate guns. Aided by artillery, the Confederates repelled the Northerners with a ring of fire. Of the 4,500 Union attackers, nearly 700 became casualties. Confederate losses were fewer than 200 out of a force of 1,000. The Confederate victory at the Battle of Secessionville blunted what proved to be the Union’s best chance to capture Charleston.

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Rivers
February 10, 2014

“R” is for Rivers. South Carolina has an abundance of rivers that originate within the state or that enters from Georgia and North Carolina and drain land as far away as Virginia. These rivers flow generally from the northwest to the southeast. The Santee River system is the largest on the east coast. The Savannah River forms the western boundary of South Carolina. The third river system is the Pee Dee, which is the only river system in the state left undammed. Some of the most beautiful rivers in the state are those that begin in the coastal plain. Tannic acid in the organic matter found in these rivers gives them a dark cast, and so they are known as “black rivers.” The Edisto is the largest of the black rivers in South Carolina and one of the most pristine.

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Vesta Mills
February 07, 2014

“V” is for Vesta Mills of Charleston. In 1899 Spartanburg textile manufacturer John Montgomery and New York merchant Seth Milliken purchased the Charleston Cotton Mills and renamed it Vesta Mills. The new owners intended to operate the mill with African American labor. This was a controversial decision and was made partly in response to the efforts of union organizers in the state's textile industry. In the press, the closure of the mill in 1901 was attributed to the failure of its black work force. One stockholder faulted Milliken, accusing him of taking “every means to show the colored labor unprofitable. Those negro women could tie a knot at a spindle as well as white women could.” The closing of Vesta Mills ended the employment of black labor in the state's textile industry which remained segregated until the 1960s.

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Unionists
February 06, 2014

“U” is for Unionists. Unionists in South Carolina were anti-scessionists and supporters of the federal Union in the decades prior to the Civil War—especially during the Nullification Crisis of the 1830s and the secession crises of 1850 and 1860.  Unionist strongholds were in white majority districts such as Greenville, Horry, Pickens, and Spartanburg. Although unable to prevent the passage of the Ordinance of Nullification, they created a statewide network of militia units that were in contact with President Andrew Jackson. In part, because of determined Unionist opposition—and the threat of internal armed conflict—the nullifiers sought compromise rather than confrontation with the federal government. Among the leading Unionists were Joel R. Poinsett, James L. Petigru, and Benjamin F. Perry.

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Taxpayers Conventions
February 05, 2014

“T” is for Taxpayers' Conventions. In 1871 and 1874 white Democrats, frustrated with high taxes and the Republicans' domination of state government, held statewide conventions to register their protests. The 1871 convention met in response to protest that year's tax increase to the unheard of level of eleven mills on the dollar.  In 1873 widespread reports of profligate spending and financial malfeasance by the Republican state government and another tax increase led to a second convention. This body petitioned the President and Congress, complaining of “taxation without representation” by which they meant that the class that paid the bulk of the taxes—white Democrats—was unable to win elective office.  The Taxpayers' Conventions of 1871 and 1874 did  succeed in shaming the Republicans into launching their own investigation which led to  fiscal reforms under Governor Daniel Chamberlain.

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St. David’s Church
February 04, 2014

“S” is for St. David's Church in Cheraw. St. David's Parish was established in 1768 and construction on the parish church—known locally as “Old St. David's”--began in the 1770s. Although similar to other colonial Anglican churches, the frame building was less ornate. During the Revolution, the British used the church as a hospital. After the war, there was no resident clergyman and the building fell into disuse. In 1819, an Episcopal clergyman helped revive the congregation and the structure was enlarged and a steeple added. A century later, the congregation completed a new sanctuary in downtown Cheraw and the old church building was used only sporadically. In the 1970s the congregation gave “Old St. David's”  Church to the Chesterfield County Historic Preservation Commission which restored the building to its early nineteenth-century appearance. 

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Rainey, Joseph
February 03, 2014

“R” is for Rainey, Joseph Hayne [1832-1887. Congressman. Rainey was born a slave, but his father—a barber--was able to purchase his family's freedom. During the Civil War he was forced to serve as a steward on a blockade-runner and to work on Confederate fortifications. In 1862 he and his wife fled to Bermuda where he remained until the war was over. Returning home, he  represented Georgetown in the Constitutional Convention of 1868, and both the South Carolina House and Senate. In 1870 he became the first African-American elected to the United States House of Representatives where he advocated passage of  an amnesty bill for former Confederates and the Civil Rights Act of 1875. After leaving Congress,  Joseph Hayne Rainey  was involved in various business enterprises in South Carolina and Washington, D.C.

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January 2014

Piedmont and Northern Railway
January 31, 2014

“P” is for Piedmont and Northern Railway. James B. Duke planned the Piedmont and Northern [P&N] electric railway to assist in the industrialization of the Piedmont region of the Carolinas. The line was envisioned as eventually connecting Greenwood, South Carolina, with Norfolk, Virginia. Between 1911 and 1914, an initial 89-mile line between Greenwood and Spartanburg was completed and connected with Duke’s existing line between Belton and Anderson. Throughout the 1920s and 1930s “The Electric” or “The Poor and Needy,” as it was known locally, carried workers to their jobs in the mills, shoppers to larger cities, freight traffic, among other business activities. Passenger traffic peaked in 1921 and then began to decline. Many of the Piedmont and Northern’s yellow-brick and red-tile-roofed stations, although used for other purposes, continued to be valued by their respective communities in the 21st century.

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McMillan, Claude Richelieu
January 30, 2014

“M” is for McMillan, Claude Richelieu [1899-1961]. Engineer. After graduating from USC with a degree in civil engineering, McMillan went to work with the South Carolina Highway Department. In 1941 the able engineer and administrator was named state highway engineer. As state engineer, he advocated the change from concrete to bituminous-surfaced roads. In 1948 he became Chief Highway Commissioner. His tenure was one of unparalleled growth. He created a division to oversee license examinations and the Highway Patrol. In 1950 he successfully lobbied for a one-cent increase in the state gas tax to fund the construction and maintenance of the state’s burgeoning highway system. To him, the key to safe roadways was the construction of controlled-access highways with frontage roads. The pinnacle of Claude Richelieu McMillan’s came when the U.S. Congress authorized $98 million over three years for South Carolina’s interstate highways.

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Logan, Martha Daniell
January 29, 2014

“L” is for Logan, Martha Daniell [1704-1779]. Horticulturist. When her father died in 1718, Martha Daniell inherited 48,000 acres on the Wando River and her father’s nursery business. Although she received a tradition girl’s education, she learned to cultivate plants from her father and several friends. Because landscaping with rare plants had become a favorite pastime among wealthy Charlestonians, Logan realized that amateur gardeners needed advice. She published the “Gardener’s Kalendar,” which became a standard text for colonial South Carolina gardeners, and contributed a gardening guide for John Tobler’s South Carolina Almanack. She exchanged seeds with other botanical enthusiasts, including the naturalist John Bartram. He praised her in his letters to friends in London. As a professional horticulturist, Martha Daniell Logan sold roots, cuttings, bulbs, plants, and seeds at her nursery that was located on the Green, near Trott’s Point.

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Highway 17
January 28, 2014

“H” is for Highway 17. Also known as the Ocean Highway, U.S. Highway 17 enters South Carolina at the North Carolina border near Little River, then hugs the coast for almost two hundred miles before exiting the state at Savannah, Georgia. It is the linear descendent of the King’s Highway, a colonial-era post road that connected the American colonies by 1750. Traces of the colonial highway can still be found.  The first straightening and paving of the King’s Highway in South Carolina began in 1927, when bridges were built to cross the main inlets. In the first half of the 20th century, the highway was instrumental in bringing tourists to Myrtle Beach and the Grand Strand. Today, Highway 17 closely follows the route that Native Americans, early settlers, and even President George Washington traveled more than two centuries ago.

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Graniteville Company
January 27, 2014

“G” is for Graniteville Company. Chartered by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1845, the Graniteville Company was one of the earliest and most successful textile manufacturing operations in the South. The guiding light behind its creation was William Gregg, a successful Charleston jeweler-turned-manufacturer who became a leading proponent of southern industrialization during the antebellum era. The company’s initial capitalization was $300,000. The company commenced operations in 1849 in a massive granite factory located on the banks of Horse Creek in southern Edgefield District [now Aiken County]. Most pre-Civil War southern manufacturers employed slave labor, but Gregg employed free white laborers—mostly women and teenagers. It was one of the few southern manufacturing companies to survive the Civil War intact. After the war it expanded, building new factories in neighboring Vaucluse and Warrenville and acquiring mills in Augusta. After World War II, the Graniteville Company pioneered the production of permanent-press textiles.

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Fundamentalists
January 24, 2014

“F” is for Fundamentalists. The designation “fundamentalists” is an umbrella term that takes in many theologically conservative, evangelical Protestants from several denominations and independent congregations. As a movement, fundamentalism emerged in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as a reaction to “modernist” currents that embraced historical-critical methods of studying the Bible. In time fundamentalism came to represent a belief system that stressed a literal interpretation of the Scriptures. In South Carolina in the 1920s some individuals who embraced fundamentalism began to plant their message across denominational lines when they started schools and Bible colleges. For example, Columbia Bible College [now Columbia International University] president Robert McQuilkin, although a Presbyterian by affiliation, was a committed fundamentalist. The strength of fundamentalism in South Carolina remains the hundreds of independent congregations, many using the designation Baptist or some variation of Gospel Fellowship in their names.

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Eutaw Springs, Battle of
January 23, 2014

“E” is for Eutaw Springs, Battle of [September 8 1781]. The Battle of Eutaw Springs was the last major engagement in South Carolina during the Revolutionary War. In the bloody encounter, some two thousand Continental and militia soldiers commanded by General Nathanael Greene clashed with 2,300 British Regulars and Loyalists under Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Stewart. Although Greene was forced to leave the field, the British were equally mauled and retreated to Charleston, abandoning the upcountry. Losses on both sides were high: the British admitted 683 killed, wounded and missing; and the Americans reported 517. Among the American unit commanders were many notable patriots including Francis Marion, William Washington, Henry Lee, Andrew Pickens, and Wade Hampton. The site of the Battle of Eutaw Springs is located in Orangeburg County near Eutawville, and a portion of the battlefield is a state historic site.

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Drayton, Wm Henry
January 22, 2014

“D” is for Drayton, William Henry [1742-1779]. Revolutionary Leader. Planter. He was educated in England. In 1769, his essay in the South Carolina Gazette, opposing the non-importation association, created a political firestorm that resulted in his being ostracized politically, socially, and economically. He went to England where he hoped his views would be more appreciative. In England, he published The Letters of Freeman, a compilation of his essays in favor of British imperial policy—which won for him a seat on South Carolina’s Royal Council. Back home, increasingly concerned about imperial policies, he became an outspoken champion of colonial rights. In 1774 he was elected a member of the Provincial Congress, sat all the important revolutionary committees, and served as President of the Congress. In 1776, William Henry Drayton became the first prominent South Carolinian to openly call for separation from Great Britain. 

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Charleston Ironwork
January 21, 2014

“C” is for Charleston Ironwork. Elements of decorative iron first appeared on Charleston buildings during the middle decades of the eighteenth century. Crafted by local blacksmiths, they closely followed the designs of British architect and furniture designer, Robert Adam. After the revolution, the designs of local architects and blacksmiths dominated the production of Charleston wrought iron. Among the noted pieces from this era is the much-celebrated Sword Gate, designed by Charles Reichert and forged by Christopher Werner. Imported and locally made ornate cast iron appeared in the 19th century, but Charlestonians continued to prefer hand-forged decorative elements created by local blacksmiths—rather than the florid Victorian iron lace. In the 20th century, the city’s blacksmiths continued to craft decorative pieces as a sideline to their main employment—shoeing horses. Among these was Philip Simmons, the most famous crafter of Charleston ironwork.

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Black Business Districts
January 20, 2014

“B” is for Black Business Districts. Prior to the Civil War, free persons of color in South Carolina owned businesses—generally in the service industry—such as blacksmith and harness shops. These businesses served and operated within both the black and white communities. Once segregation was enacted in the 1890s, black business districts appeared. Jim Crow laws forced many businesses either to operate separate facilities for black customers—or deny them service. Black entrepreneurs stepped in to establish operations in which African Americans could be served with courtesy and dignity. Residential segregation in many cities restricted most of these businesses to African American sections of towns and cities. This led to the creation of black business districts that flourished until the 1960s. With the demise of legal segregation and the onset of gentrification, many traditionally black business districts declined or disappeared. 

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Wilkes Fund Controversy
January 17, 2014

Wilkes Fund Controversy

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Scofield Normal and Industrial School
January 16, 2014

Scofield Normal and Industrial School

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Right to Work Law
January 15, 2014

Right to Work Law

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Pickens
January 14, 2014

Pickens

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McEntire Air National Guard Station
January 13, 2014

McEntire Air National Guard Station

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Epidemics
January 10, 2014

Epidemics

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Dr. Buzzard
January 09, 2014

Dr. Buzzard

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Chamberlain, Daniel Henry
January 08, 2014

Chamberlain, Daniel Henry

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Bennettsville
January 07, 2014

Bennettsville

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Asparagus
January 06, 2014

Asparagus

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African Methodist Episcopal Church
January 03, 2014

African American Episcopal Church

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Whitten Center
January 02, 2014

Whitten Center

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2013

McCray, John Henry
January 01, 2014

McCray, John Henry

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December 2013

Lintheads
December 31, 2013

Lintheads

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Hemphill, Robert Witherspoon
December 30, 2013

Hemphill, Robert Witherspoon

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Fraiser, Joseph William
December 27, 2013

Fraiser, Joseph William

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Enterprise Railroad
December 26, 2013

Enterprise Railroad

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Dock Street Theatre
December 25, 2013

Dock Street Theatre

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Chalmers, Lionel
December 24, 2013

Chalmers, Lionel

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Bennett, Thomas, Jr.
December 23, 2013

Bennett, Thomas, Jr.

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Asian Religions
December 20, 2013

Asian Religions

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Truck Farming
December 19, 2013

Truck Farming

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Sayre, Christopher Gadsen
December 18, 2013

Sayre, Christopher Gadsen

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Richardson Waltz, The
December 17, 2013

Richardson Waltz, The

Richardson Waltz from SCIWAY on Vimeo.

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Phifer, Mary Hardy
December 16, 2013

Phifer, Mary Hardy

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Town Theatre
December 13, 2013

Town Theatre

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Santee River
December 12, 2013

Santee River

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Rice trunks
December 11, 2013

Rice trunks

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Pentecostals
December 10, 2013

Pentecostals

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Mcbee Chapel
December 09, 2013

Mcbee Chapel

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Grand Strand
December 06, 2013

Grand Strand

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Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina
December 05, 2013

Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina

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Drayton, Percival
December 04, 2013

Drayton, Percival

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Charleston Hospital Workers Strike 1969
December 03, 2013

Charleston Hospital Workers Strike, 1969

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November 2013

Fuller, William Edward
November 18, 2013

Fuller, William Edward

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Evans, John Gary
November 15, 2013

Evans, John Gary

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Drayton, John
November 14, 2013

Drayton, John

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Charleston County
November 13, 2013

Charleston County

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Big Thursday
November 12, 2013

Big Thursday

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Ayllons, Lucas Vasquez
November 11, 2013

Ayllons, Lucas Vasquez

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Wigfall, Louis Trezevant
November 08, 2013

Wigfall, Louis Trezevant

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Scarborough, William Harrison
November 07, 2013

Scarborough, William Harrison

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Pickens, William
November 06, 2013

Pickens, William

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McKissick, James Rion
November 05, 2013

McKissick, James Rion

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Lizard Man
November 04, 2013

Lizard Man

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Heyward-Washington House
November 01, 2013

Heyward-Washington House

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October 2013

Governor’s Schools
October 31, 2013

Governor's Schools

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Freneau, Peter
October 30, 2013

Freneau, Peter

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Evans, Emily Plume
October 29, 2013

Evans, Emily Plume

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Dozier, James Cordie
October 28, 2013

Dozier, James Cordie

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Charleston, Siege of
October 25, 2013

Charleston, Siege of

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Bettis Academy
October 24, 2013

Bettis Academy

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Audubon, John James
October 23, 2013

Audubon, John James

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Williams, David Rogerson
October 22, 2013

Williams, David Rogerson

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Tuscarora War
October 21, 2013

Tuscarora War

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Sea Pines Company
October 04, 2013

Sea Pines Company

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Ripley, Alexandra Braid
October 03, 2013

Ripley, Alexandra Braid

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Pickens, Francis Wilkinson
October 02, 2013

Pickens, Francis Wilkinson

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McKinney, Nina Mae
October 01, 2013

McKinney, Nina Mae

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September 2013

Littlejohn, Nina
September 30, 2013

Littlejohn, Nina

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Heyward, Thomas, Jr.
September 27, 2013

Heyward, Thomas, Jr. - planter, legislator, jurist, signer of the Declaration of Independence

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Governor’s Mansion
September 26, 2013

Governor's Mansion

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Freemasonry
September 25, 2013

Freemasonry

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Dorn, William Jennings Bryan
September 24, 2013

Dorn, William Jennings Bryan - congressman.

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Charleston
September 23, 2013

Charleston

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Bethune, Mary McCleod
September 20, 2013

Bethune, Mary McCleod - educator, social activist, government official

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Atzjar
September 19, 2013

Atzjar

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Wilkinson, Robert Shaw
September 18, 2013

Wilkinson, Robert Shaw - college president.

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Sea Islands
September 17, 2013

Sea Islands

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Ring Shout
September 16, 2013

Ring Shout

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August 2013

Goose Creek Men, The
August 30, 2013

Goose Creek Men, The

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Freedom Rides
August 29, 2013

Freedom Rides (1961-1962)

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Dorchester
August 28, 2013

Dorchester (est. 1697).

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Charismatics
August 27, 2013

Charismatics

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Best Friend of Charleston
August 26, 2013

Best Friend of Charleston

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Attakulla Kulla
August 23, 2013

Attakulla Kulla (d. ca. 1780). Cherokee leader, diplomat.

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Wilkinson, Marion Bernie
August 22, 2013

Wilkinson, Marion Bernie (1870-1956). Social reformer.

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Turner, Henry McNeal
August 21, 2013

Turner, Henry McNeal (1834-1915). Clergyman, politician.

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Scott, Robert Kingston
August 20, 2013

Scott, Robert Kingston (1826-1900). Governor.

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Riley, Richard Wilson
August 19, 2013

Riley, Richard Wilson (b. 1933). Governor, U.S. Secretary of Education.

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McGuire, Frank Joseph
August 16, 2013

McGuire, Frank Joseph (1913-1994). Baskeball coach.

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Littlejohn, Cameron Bruce
August 15, 2013

Littlejohn, Cameron Bruce (1913-2007). Attorney, legislator, jurist.

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Heyward, DuBose
August 14, 2013

Heyward, DuBose (1885-1940). Author.

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Gospel Music
August 13, 2013

Gospel Music

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Freedmen’s Bureau
August 12, 2013

Freedmen's Bureau

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Evangel Cathedral
August 09, 2013

Evangel Cathedral (Spartanbug, SC)

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Doolittle Raiders
August 08, 2013

Doolittle Raiders

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Chapman, Martha Marshall II
August 07, 2013

Chapman, Martha Marshall II (b. 1949). Musician.

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Bessinger, Maurice
August 06, 2013

Bessinger, Maurice (b. 1930). Businessman.

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Atlantic Beach
August 05, 2013

Atlantic Beach

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McCray, Carrie Allen
August 02, 2013

McCray, Carrie Allen

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Lining, John
August 01, 2013

Lining, John

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July 2013

Hemphill, James Calvin
July 31, 2013

Hemphill, James Calvin

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Gonzales, Ambrose Ellliot
July 30, 2013

Gonzales, Ambrose Ellliot

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Fraser, Charles
July 29, 2013

Fraser, Charles

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Ensore, Joshua Fulton
July 26, 2013

Ensore, Joshua Fulton

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Doby, Lawrence Edward
July 25, 2013

Doby, Lawrence Edward

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Central
July 24, 2013

Central

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Benton, Brook
July 23, 2013

Benton, Brook

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Ashwood Plantation Project
July 22, 2013

Ashwood Plantation Project

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Schofield, Martha
July 19, 2013

Schofield, Martha

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Railroads
July 18, 2013

Railroads

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Pardo, Juan
July 17, 2013

Pardo, Juan

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Hampton
July 09, 2013

Hampton

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Garden, Alexander
July 08, 2013

Garden, Alexander

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Fields, Mamie Elizabeth Garvin
July 05, 2013

Fields, Mamie Elizabeth Garvin

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Edgefield Pottery
July 04, 2013

Edgefield Pottery

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Darlington Raceway
July 03, 2013

Darlington Raceway

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Camp Croft
July 02, 2013

Camp Croft

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June 2013

Edgefield Advertizer
June 28, 2013

Edgefield Advertizer

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Darlington
June 27, 2013

Darlington

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Camden
June 26, 2013

Camden

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Bamberg County
June 25, 2013

Bamberg County

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African Americans in the Revolutionary War
June 24, 2013

African Americans in the Revolutionary War

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Waring, Joseph Ioor
June 21, 2013

Waring, Joseph Ioor

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Palmetto Pigeon Plant
June 20, 2013

Palmetto Pigeon Plant

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Omar Inben Sahid
June 19, 2013

Omar Inben Sahid

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Negro Seamen acts
June 18, 2013

Negro Seamen acts

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Manigaux, Judith
June 17, 2013

Manigaux, Judith

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Lancaster
June 14, 2013

Lancaster

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James, John
June 13, 2013

James, John

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Industrialization
June 12, 2013

Industrialization

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Hamilton, James Jr.
June 11, 2013

Hamilton, James Jr.

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Galphin, George
June 10, 2013

Galphin, George

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Federalist Party
June 07, 2013

Federalist Party

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Edelmann, Marian Wright
June 06, 2013

Edelmann, Marian Wright

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Daniel, Wm Henry
June 05, 2013

Daniel, Wm Henry

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Calhoun County
June 04, 2013

Calhoun County

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A.M.E. Church
June 03, 2013

A.M.E. Church

Note: previous versions of this SC A-Z episode incorrectly identified the A.M.E. Church as the "African American Episcopal Church," instead of the "African Methodist Episcopal Church." We very much regret the error. It has been corrected in this episode.

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May 2013

Internal Improvement Campaigns
May 31, 2013

Internal Improvement Campaigns

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Hammond, Leroy
May 30, 2013

Hammond, Leroy

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Garden, Alexander
May 29, 2013

Garden, Alexander

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Fielding, Herbert Ulysses
May 28, 2013

Fielding, Herbert Ulysses

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Edgefield County
May 27, 2013

Edgefield County

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Darlington County
May 24, 2013

Darlington County

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Camp, Wofford Benjamin
May 23, 2013

Camp, Wofford Benjamin

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Bank of the State of South Carolina
May 22, 2013

Bank of the State of South Carolina

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McGowan, Clelia Peronneau
May 20, 2013

McGowan, Clelia Peronneau

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Bernardin, Joseph Louis
May 17, 2013

Bernardin, Joseph Louis

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Wilkinson, Eliza Young
May 16, 2013

Wilkinson, Eliza Young

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Toumey, Michael
May 15, 2013

Toumey, Michael

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Scots
May 14, 2013

Scots

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Riley, Joseph P., Jr.
May 13, 2013

Riley, Joseph P., Jr.

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Pickens, Andrew
May 10, 2013

Pickens, Andrew

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Green Thursday
May 09, 2013

Green Thursday

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Little Mountain
May 08, 2013

Little Mountain

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Heyward, James and Heyward, Nathaniel
May 07, 2013

Heyward, James and Heyward, Nathaniel

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Freed, Arthur
May 03, 2013

Freed, Arthur

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Erskine College
May 02, 2013

Erskine College

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Donaldson Air Base
May 01, 2013

Donaldson Air Base

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April 2013

Chapin, Sarah Flournoy Moore
April 30, 2013

Chapin, Sarah Flournoy Moore

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Berkeley County
April 29, 2013

Berkeley County

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Rash, Ron
April 26, 2013

Rash, Ron

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Palmetto Building, The
April 25, 2013

The Palmetto Building, Columbia, SC.

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Oliver, Robert Campbell
April 24, 2013

Oliver, Robert Campbell

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National Resource Center for First Year Experience and Students in Transition
April 23, 2013

National Resource Center for First Year Experience and Students in Transition, University of SC

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Manchester State Forrest
April 22, 2013

Manchester State Forrest

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Liberty
April 19, 2013

Liberty

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Hayne, Paul Hamilton
April 18, 2013

Hayne, Paul Hamilton

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Gist, William Henry
April 17, 2013

Gist, William Henry

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Fort Sumter
April 16, 2013

Fort Sumter

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Cashwell, Gaston Barnabus
April 15, 2013

Cashwell, Gaston Barnabus

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Bee, Barnard Elliot
April 12, 2013

Bee, Barnard Elliot

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Animals
April 11, 2013

Animals

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White, Vanna
April 10, 2013

White, Vanna

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Township Plan
April 09, 2013

Township Plan

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Savannah National Wildlife Refuge
April 08, 2013

Savannah National Wildlife Refuge

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March 2013

Literary and Philosophical Society
March 29, 2013

Literary and Philosophical Society

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Herald Journal
March 28, 2013

Herald Journal

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Goose Creek
March 27, 2013

Goose Creek

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Free Persons of Color
March 26, 2013

Free Persons of Color

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Tuberculosis
March 22, 2013

Tuberculosis

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Tucker, Cornelia Dabney
March 14, 2013

Tucker, Cornelia Dabney

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Schofield, Martha
March 13, 2013

Schofield, Martha

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Ridgeland
March 12, 2013

Ridgeland

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Phosphate
March 11, 2013

Phosphate

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Johnson, William Woodward
March 08, 2013

Johnson, William Woodward

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Tobacco barns
March 07, 2013

Tobacco barns

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Sandlapper
March 06, 2013

Sandlapper

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Rice
March 05, 2013

Rice

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Pelzer, Francis Joseph
March 04, 2013

Pelzer, Francis Joseph

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McDuffie, George
March 01, 2013

McDuffie, George

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February 2013

Lister, Hovie Franklin
February 28, 2013

Lister, Hovie Franklin

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Herald, The
February 27, 2013

Herald, The

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Gonzales, Wm Elliott
February 26, 2013

Gonzales, Wm Elliott

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Frederick, Nathaniel Jerome
February 25, 2013

Frederick, Nathaniel Jerome

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Ellison, Lillian
February 15, 2013

Ellison, Lillian (The Fabulous Moolah)

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Deveaux, Andrew IV
February 14, 2013

Deveaux, Andrew IV

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Carolina Wren
February 13, 2013

Carolina Wren: the South Carolina State Bird

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Beaufort
February 12, 2013

Beaufort

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Anderson College
February 11, 2013

Anderson College

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Richland County
February 05, 2013

Richland County

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Phoenix Riot, The
February 04, 2013

Phoenix Riot, The

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January 2013

Gonzales, Narciso Gener
January 29, 2013

Gonzales, Narciso Gener

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Watson, Ebbie Julian
January 04, 2013

Watson, Ebbie Julian

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Dawson, Frances Witherspoon
January 03, 2013

Dawson, Frances Witherspoon

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Canal Holdings
January 02, 2013

Canal Holdings

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Barnwell
January 01, 2013

Barnwell

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December 2012

Aiken County
December 31, 2012

Aiken County

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2012

Quit rents
December 21, 2012

Quit rents

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Palmer Field
December 20, 2012

Palmer Field

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Okra
December 19, 2012

Okra

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National Baptists
December 18, 2012

National Baptists

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Magnolia Cemetery
December 17, 2012

Magnolia Cemetery

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November 2012

Whitten, Benjamine Otis
November 30, 2012

Whitten, Benjamine Otis

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Trott, Nicholas
November 29, 2012

Trott, Nicholas

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Sayle, William
November 28, 2012

Sayle, William

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Richardson, Bobby
November 27, 2012

Richardson, Bobby

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Peurifoy, John Emil
November 26, 2012

Peurifoy, John Emil

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McCrady, John
November 23, 2012

McCrady, John

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Lindo, Moses
November 22, 2012

Lindo, Moses

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Hembel, Caroline Etheredge
November 21, 2012

Hembel, Caroline Etheredge

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Golf
November 20, 2012

Golf

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Francis Marion National Forest
November 19, 2012

Francis Marion National Forest

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Enoree River
November 16, 2012

Enoree River

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Dixon Bros, Dorsey & Howard
November 15, 2012

Dixon Bros, Dorsey & Howard

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Cayce
November 14, 2012

Cayce

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Bennett, John
November 13, 2012

Bennett, John

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Ashmore, Harry Scott
November 12, 2012

Ashmore, Harry Scott

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Townes, Charles Hard
November 09, 2012

Townes, Charles Hard

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Sass, Herbert Ravenel
November 08, 2012

Sass, Herbert Ravenel

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Richards, John Gardenier, Jr.
November 07, 2012

Richards, John Gardenier, Jr.

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Perry, Benjamin Franklin
November 06, 2012

Perry, Benjamin Franklin

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McClennan, Alonzo Clifton
November 05, 2012

McClennan, Alonzo Clifton

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Whittaker, Miller Fulton
November 02, 2012

Whittaker, Miller Fulton

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Trescott, Wm Henry
November 01, 2012

Trescott, Wm Henry

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October 2012

Sayers, Valerie
October 31, 2012

Sayers, Valerie

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Richardson, Richard
October 30, 2012

Richardson, Richard

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Petroglyphs
October 29, 2012

Petroglyphs

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McCrady, Edward, Jr.
October 26, 2012

McCrady, Edward, Jr.

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Lincoln, Benjamin
October 25, 2012

Lincoln, Benjamin

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Heller, Max
October 24, 2012

Heller, Max

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Goldstein, Joseph Leonard
October 23, 2012

Goldstein, Joseph Leonard

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Fox, William Price
October 22, 2012

Fox, William Price

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Lexington County
October 19, 2012

Lexington County

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Judicial System
October 18, 2012

Judicial System

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Hayne, Henry
October 17, 2012

Hayne, Henry

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Girardeau, Jean LaFayette
October 16, 2012

Girardeau, Jean LaFayette

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Fort Prince George
October 15, 2012

Fort Prince George

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Dickson, Henry
October 12, 2012

Dickson, Henry

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Casey, Claude
October 11, 2012

Casey, Claude

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Anderson Motor Car Company
October 10, 2012

Anderson Motor Car Company

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White, John Blake
October 09, 2012

White, John Blake

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Towne, Laura Matilda
October 08, 2012

Towne, Laura Matilda

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English, Alexander
October 05, 2012

English, Alexander

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Dixiecrats
October 04, 2012

Dixiecrats

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Cattle Ranching
October 03, 2012

Cattle Ranching 

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Benedict College
October 02, 2012

Benedict College

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Ashley River Road
October 01, 2012

Ashley River Road

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September 2012

Whittaker, John Chesnut
September 28, 2012

Whittaker, John Chesnut

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Trenholm, George Alfred
September 27, 2012

Trenholm, George Alfred

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Saxe Gotha Township
September 26, 2012

Saxe Gotha Township

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Richardson, John Peter, III
September 25, 2012

Richardson, John Peter, III

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Petigru, James Louis
September 24, 2012

Petigru, James Louis

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McCottry, Catherine Mae McKee
September 21, 2012

McCottry, Catherine Mae McKee

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Limestone College
September 20, 2012

Limestone College

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Hebrew Orphan Society
September 19, 2012

Hebrew Orphan Society

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Gold Mining
September 18, 2012

Gold Mining

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Fountain Inn
September 17, 2012

Fountain Inn

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English, The
September 14, 2012

English, The

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Dixie Hummingbirds, The
September 13, 2012

Dixie Hummingbirds, The

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Catholics
September 12, 2012

Catholics

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Benbridge, Henry
September 11, 2012

Benbridge, Henry

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Ashley River, The
September 10, 2012

Ashley River, The

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Whitfield, George
September 07, 2012

Whitfield, George

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Treaty of Augusta
September 06, 2012

Treaty of Augusta

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Sawyer, Frederick Adolphus
September 05, 2012

Sawyer, Frederick Adolphus

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Richardson, John Peter
September 04, 2012

Richardson, John Peter

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Peterkin, Julia Mood
September 03, 2012

Peterkin, Julia Mood

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August 2012

McCormick County
August 31, 2012

McCormick County

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Lighthouses
August 30, 2012

Lighthouses

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Heath Charter
August 29, 2012

Heath Charter

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Godbold, Lucille Ellerbe
August 28, 2012

Godbold, Lucille Ellerbe

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Fossils
August 27, 2012

Fossils

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England, John
August 24, 2012

England, John

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Divorce
August 23, 2012

Divorce

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Catesby, Mark
August 22, 2012

Catesby, Mark

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Belton
August 21, 2012

Belton

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Art
August 20, 2012

Art

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White-Tailed Deer
August 17, 2012

White-Tailed Deer

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Travis, William Barret
August 16, 2012

 Travis, William Barret

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Sawyer, Benjamin Mack
August 15, 2012

Sawyer, Benjamin Mack

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Richardson, James Burchell
August 14, 2012

Richardson, James Burchell

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Perry, William Anthony
August 13, 2012

Perry, William Anthony

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McCord, Louisa Susanna Cheves
August 10, 2012

McCord, Louisa Susanna Cheves

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Lieber, Oscar Montgomery
August 09, 2012

Lieber, Oscar Montgomery

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Haynsworth, Clement Furman, Jr.
August 08, 2012

Haynsworth, Clement Furman, Jr.

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Glen, James
August 07, 2012

Glen, James

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Forty-Acre Rock
August 06, 2012

Forty-Acre Rock

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Dissenters
August 03, 2012

Dissenters

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Catawbas
August 02, 2012

Catawbas

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Beech Island Agricultural Club
August 01, 2012

Beech Island Agricultural Club

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July 2012

Architecture
July 31, 2012

Architecture

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White Primary
July 30, 2012

White Primary

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Transportation
July 27, 2012

Transportation

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Savannah River Site
July 26, 2012

 Savannah River Site

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Richardson, Eudora Ramsay
July 25, 2012

Richardson, Eudora Ramsay

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Perry, Mattie Elmina
July 24, 2012

Perry, Mattie Elmina

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McCollough, John DeWitt
July 23, 2012

McCollough, John DeWitt

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Jews
July 20, 2012

Jews

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Irmo
July 19, 2012

Irmo

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Hamrick, Wylie Cicero
July 18, 2012

Hamrick, Wylie Cicero

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General Assembly, The
July 17, 2012

General Assembly, The

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First S.C. Regiment
July 16, 2012

First S.C. Regiment

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Education Improvement Act
July 13, 2012

Education Improvement Act

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DeBow, James Dunwoody Brownson
July 12, 2012

DeBow, James Dunwoody Brownson

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Can Am Days
July 11, 2012

Can Am Days

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Barnwell, John
July 10, 2012

Barnwell, John

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Aiken-Rhett House
July 09, 2012

Aiken-Rhett House

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Waxhaws, the
July 06, 2012

Waxhaws, the

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Thompson, Waddy, Jr.
July 05, 2012

Thompson, Waddy, Jr.

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St. Phillips Church
July 04, 2012

St. Phillips Church

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Reconstruction
July 03, 2012

Reconstruction

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Parris Island
July 02, 2012

Parris Island

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June 2012

Yellow Jessamine
June 29, 2012

Yellow Jessamine

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Walker, Billy
June 28, 2012

Walker, Billy

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Eastern Tiger Swallow Tail Butterfly
June 27, 2012

Eastern Tiger Swallow Tail Butterfly

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Cane Hoy riot
June 26, 2012

Cane Hoy riot

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B’hai
June 25, 2012

B'hai

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Lieber, Francis
June 22, 2012

Lieber, Francis

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Hayne, Robert Young
June 21, 2012

Hayne, Robert Young

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Gleaves, Richard Howell
June 20, 2012

Gleaves, Richard Howell

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Ft. Watson
June 19, 2012

Ft. Watson

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Emancipation
June 18, 2012

Emancipation

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Waxhaws, the (area)
June 15, 2012

Waxhaws, the (area)

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Thornwell, James Henry
June 14, 2012

Thornwell, James Henry

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St. Phillips Parish
June 13, 2012

St. Phillips Parish

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Red Dots
June 12, 2012

Red Dots

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Particular Baptists
June 11, 2012

Particular Baptists

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May 2012

Dispensary
May 31, 2012

Dispensary

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Catawba Pottery
May 30, 2012

Catawba pottery

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Beech Island
May 29, 2012

Beech Island

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Archdale, John
May 28, 2012

Archdale, John

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Ansel, Martin Frederick
May 25, 2012

Ansel, Martin Frederick

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White Lightning
May 24, 2012

White Lightning

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Traditional Medicine
May 23, 2012

Traditional Medicine

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Savanah River
May 22, 2012

Savanah River

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Richardson, Eudora Ramsey
May 21, 2012

Richardson, Eudora Ramsey

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Perry, Matthew J., Jr.
May 18, 2012

Perry, Matthew J., Jr.

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McColl, Hugh Leon, Jr.
May 17, 2012

McColl, Hugh Leon, Jr.

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Just, Ernest Everett
May 15, 2012

Just, Ernest Everett

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Emancipation
May 09, 2012

Emancipation

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Dillon County
May 08, 2012

Dillon County

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April 2012

Richardson, Dorcas Nelson
April 27, 2012

Richardson, Dorcas Nelson

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Perry, James Margrave
April 26, 2012

Perry, James Margrave

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McColl
April 25, 2012

McColl

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Liberian Exodus
April 24, 2012

Liberian Exodus

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Judson, Mary Camilla
April 23, 2012

Judson, Mary Camilla

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Hayne, Isaac
April 20, 2012

Hayne, Isaac

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Gist, States Rights
April 19, 2012

Gist, States Rights

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Ft. San Felipe
April 18, 2012

Ft. San Felipe

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Elmore vs. Rice
April 17, 2012

Elmore vs. Rice

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Dillon
April 16, 2012

Dillon

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Cash, Wilbur Joseph
April 13, 2012

Cash, Wilbur Joseph

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Beauty Pageants
April 12, 2012

Beauty Pageants

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Andrews
April 11, 2012

Andrews

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White, Joshua Daniel
April 10, 2012

White, Joshua Daniel

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Lexington County
April 02, 2012

Lexington County

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March 2012

Beaufort National Cemetery
March 22, 2012

Beaufort National Cemetery

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Sapp, Claude Napolean
March 16, 2012

Sapp, Claude Napolean

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Richards, James Prioleaux
March 15, 2012

Richards, James Prioleaux

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Periagua
March 14, 2012

Periagua

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McCall, James
March 13, 2012

McCall, James

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February 2012

White, Edward Brickell
February 27, 2012

White, Edward Brickell

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January 2012

timber
January 27, 2012

timber

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Salley, E. C.
January 26, 2012

Salley, E. C.

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Reformed Episcopal Church
January 25, 2012

Reformed Episcopal Church

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Paul, Marian B.
January 24, 2012

Paul, Marian B.

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Owens Field
January 23, 2012

Owens Field

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Manigault, Gabriel
January 20, 2012

Manigault, Gabriel

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Lancaster courthouse and jail
January 19, 2012

Lancaster courthouse and jail

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Kiawah Island
January 18, 2012

Kiawah Island

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Jasper, William
January 17, 2012

Jasper, William

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Hammett, Henry P.
January 16, 2012

Hammett, Henry P.

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Gantt, Harvey
January 13, 2012

Gantt, Harvey

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Femmes Soles Traders
January 12, 2012

Femmes Soles traders

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Edgefield
January 11, 2012

Edgefield

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Dark Corner
January 10, 2012

Dark Corner

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death penalty
January 09, 2012

death penalty

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Inter-urbans
January 06, 2012

Inter-urbans

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Hampton
January 05, 2012

Hampton

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Garden, Alexander
January 04, 2012

Garden, Alexander

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Fields, Mamie Elizabeth Garvin
January 03, 2012

Fields, Mamie Elizabeth Garvin

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Edgefield pottery
January 02, 2012

Edgefield pottery

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2011

December 2011

Darlington Raceway
December 30, 2011

Darlington Raceway

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Camp Croft
December 29, 2011

Camp Croft

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Banks, Anna DeCosta
December 28, 2011

Banks, Anna DeCosta

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Waring, Joseph I. Jr.
December 26, 2011

Waring, Joseph I. Jr.

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Ellison, William
December 23, 2011

Ellison, William

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Dial, Nathaniel Barksdale
December 22, 2011

Dial, Nathaniel Barksdale

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Carroll, Richard
December 21, 2011

Carroll, Richard

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Beaufort County
December 20, 2011

Beaufort County

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Anderson County
December 19, 2011

Anderson County

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White, Benjamin Franklin
December 16, 2011

White, Benjamin Franklin

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Tourism
December 15, 2011

Tourism

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Santee National Wildlife Refuge
December 14, 2011

Santee National Wildlife Refuge

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Rice milling
December 13, 2011

Rice milling.

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Penn Center
December 12, 2011

Penn Center

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McBee, Vardry
December 09, 2011

McBee, Vardry

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Lever, Francis Asbury
December 08, 2011

Lever, Francis Asbury

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Jones and Lee
December 07, 2011

Jones and Lee

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Haskell, Alexander Cheves
December 06, 2011

Haskell, Alexander Cheves

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Gillon, Alexander
December 05, 2011

Gillon, Alexander

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railroads
December 02, 2011

railroads

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Nance, Milligan Maceo, Jr.
December 01, 2011

Nance, Milligan Maceo, Jr.

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November 2011

Indigo
November 30, 2011

Indigo

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Hamburg
November 29, 2011

Hamburg

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Galivants Ferry stump meeting
November 28, 2011

Galivants Ferry stump meeting

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Fort Mott
November 25, 2011

Fort Mott

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Whipper, William J.
November 17, 2011

Whipper, William J.

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Thompkins, Daniel Augustus
November 16, 2011

Tompkins, Daniel Augustus

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Santee Cooper
November 15, 2011

Santee Cooper

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rice dishes
November 14, 2011

rice dishes

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Pendleton Messenger
November 11, 2011

Pendleton Messenger

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Mays, Benjamin Ellijah
November 10, 2011

Mays, Benjamin Elijah

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Lettered Olive
November 09, 2011

Lettered Olive

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Jones, Jehu
November 08, 2011

Jones, Jehu

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hash
November 07, 2011

hash

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Gillonsville Baptist Church
November 04, 2011

Gillonsville Baptist Church

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Fort Moore
November 02, 2011

Fort Moore

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DeSaussure, Wm Ford
November 01, 2011

DeSaussure, William Ford

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October 2011

Wolf Spider
October 31, 2011

Wolf Spider

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Rice, John Andrew Jr
October 28, 2011

Rice, John Andrew Jr

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Pendleton
October 27, 2011

Pendleton

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Maybank, Burnett Rhett
October 26, 2011

Maybank, Burnett Rhett

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LeJau, Francis
October 25, 2011

LeJau, Francis

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Johnston, Olin D.
October 24, 2011

Johnston, Olin D.

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Marlboro County
October 21, 2011

Marlboro County

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Cardozo, Francis Lewis
October 20, 2011

Cardozo, Francis Lewis

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Barry, Margaret Catherine Moore
October 19, 2011

Barry, Margaret Catherine Moore

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Allen, William Hervey, Jr.
October 18, 2011

Allen, William Hervey, Jr.

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Wells, Helena
October 17, 2011

Wells, Helena

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Tindall, George Brown
October 14, 2011

Tindall, George Brown

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Sandhills State Forest
October 13, 2011

Sandhills State Forest

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Revolutionary War
October 12, 2011

Revolutionary War

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Peachtree Rock
October 11, 2011

Peachtree Rock

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Nullification
October 10, 2011

Nullification

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Mason Lee’s will
October 07, 2011

Mason Lee's will

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Leevy, Carroll Moten
October 06, 2011

Leevy, Carroll Moten

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Johnson, Robert
October 05, 2011

Johnson, Robert

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Harper, Robert Goodloe
October 04, 2011

Harper, Robert Goodloe

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Gibbes, Robert
October 03, 2011

Gibbes, Robert

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September 2011

Rice, John Andrew Jr.
September 30, 2011

Rice, John Andrew Jr.

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Pendleton
September 29, 2011

Pendleton

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Maybank, Burnett Rhett
September 28, 2011

Maybank, Burnett Rhett

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LeJau, Francis
September 27, 2011

LeJau, Francis

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Johnston, Olin DeWitt
September 26, 2011

Johnston, Olin DeWitt

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Beasley, David M.
September 23, 2011

Beasley, David M.

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Anderson, Pinckney
September 22, 2011

Anderson, Pinckney

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Whipper, Lucile Simmons
September 21, 2011

Whipper, Lucile Simmons

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Tombee
September 20, 2011

Tombee

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Santee Canal
September 19, 2011

Santee Canal

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Hartsville
September 16, 2011

Hartsville

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Gillespie, John Birks “Dizzy”
September 15, 2011

Gillespie, John Birks "Dizzy"

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Fort Mill
September 14, 2011

Fort Mill

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Elliot Society of Natural History
September 13, 2011

Elliot Society of Natural History

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de Saussure, Henry William
September 12, 2011

de Saussure, Henry William

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Fort Hill
September 09, 2011

Fort Hill

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Elliott, Robert B.
September 08, 2011

Elliott, Robert B.

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Dennis, Rembert C.
September 07, 2011

Dennis, Rembert C.

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Carolina I-House
September 06, 2011

Carolina I-House

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Battery Wagner
September 02, 2011

Battery Wagner

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Voting Rights Act of 1965
September 02, 2011

Voting Rights Act of 1965

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Unitarians
September 01, 2011

Unitarians

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August 2011

Taylor, John
August 31, 2011

Taylor, John

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St. George Dorchester Parish
August 30, 2011

St. George Dorchester Parish

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Rash, Ron
August 29, 2011

Rash, Ron

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Rancier, Alonzo Jacob
August 26, 2011

Rancier, Alonzo Jacob

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National Dropout Prevention Center
August 25, 2011

National Dropout Prevention Center

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Old Iron District
August 24, 2011

Old Iron District

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Palmetto Builidng
August 23, 2011

Palmetto Building

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Maham, Hezikiah
August 22, 2011

Maham, Hezikiah

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Lamboll, Elizabeth
August 19, 2011

Lamboll, Elizabeth

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Jerimiah, Thomas
August 18, 2011

Jerimiah, Thomas

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industrialization
August 17, 2011

industrialization

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Haygood, Johnson
August 16, 2011

Haygood, Johnson

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Georgetown County
August 15, 2011

Georgetown County

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Fassoux, Peter
August 12, 2011

Fassoux, Peter

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Edgefield
August 11, 2011

Edgefield

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Daniel, W. H.
August 10, 2011

Daniel, W. H.

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Calhoun, J. C.
August 09, 2011

Calhoun, J. C.

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Baldwin, W. P.
August 08, 2011

Baldwin, W. P.

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Adams, Maddy Jean
August 05, 2011

Adams, Maddy Jean

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York
August 04, 2011

York

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Waccamaaw River
August 03, 2011

Waccamaaw River

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Venus Flytrap
August 02, 2011

Venus Flytrap

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Table Rock
August 01, 2011

Table Rock

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July 2011

St. Andrews Society
July 29, 2011

St. Andrews Society

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Rancier, Alonzo Jacob
July 28, 2011

Rancier, Alonzo Jacob

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Ribault, Jean
July 27, 2011

Ribault, Jean

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Palmetto Building
July 26, 2011

Palmetto Building

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Nance, Milligan Maceo, Jr.
July 22, 2011

Nance, Milligan Maceo, Jr.

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Manchester State Forest
July 21, 2011

Manchester State Forest

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Kershaw, Joseph Brevard
July 20, 2011

Kershaw, Joseph Brevard

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Jakes, John
July 19, 2011

Jakes, John

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Indigo
July 18, 2011

Indigo

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Hamburg
July 15, 2011

Hamburg

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Galphin, George
July 14, 2011

Galphin, George

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Farrow, Samuel
July 13, 2011

Farrow, Samuel

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Eastern Tiger Swallow Tail
July 12, 2011

Eastern Tiger Swallow Tail

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Daniel, Beth
July 11, 2011

Daniel, Beth

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Cainhoy Riot
July 08, 2011

Cainhoy Riot

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Ball, Wm. Watts
July 07, 2011

Ball, Wm. Watts

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Adams, James Hopkins
July 06, 2011

Adams, James Hopkins

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Yellow Jessamine
July 05, 2011

Yellow Jessamine

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Walker, Billy
July 04, 2011

Walker, Billy

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Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge
July 01, 2011

Carolina Sandhills National Wildlilfe Refuge

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June 2011

Beacon Drive-In
June 30, 2011

Beacon Drive-In

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Anderson
June 29, 2011

Anderson

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Whig Party
June 28, 2011

Whig Party

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Tobler, John
June 27, 2011

Tobler, John

LISTEN: Open the mp3 file


Santa Elena
June 24, 2011

Santa Elena

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Rice, James Henry, Jr.
June 23, 2011

Rice, James Henry, Jr.

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Pember, Phoebe Yates
June 22, 2011

Pember, Phoebe Yates

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Maxcey, Jonathan
June 21, 2011

Maxcey, Jonathan

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Leigh, Sir Egerton
June 20, 2011

Leigh, Sir Egerton

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Legaré, James Matthews
June 13, 2011

Legaré, James Matthew

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Maverick, Samuel Augustus
June 10, 2011

Maverick, Samuel August

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Harris, Georgia
June 08, 2011

Harris, Georgia

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Gibson, Althea
June 07, 2011

Gibson, Althea

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Ft. Jackson
June 06, 2011

Ft. Jackson

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Fort Jackson
June 06, 2011

Fort Jackson

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Elliot, Stephen
June 03, 2011

Ellen, Stephen

LISTEN: Open the mp3 file


Dent, Fredrick Bailey
June 02, 2011

Dent, Fredrick Bailey

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Carolina Mantid
June 01, 2011

Carolina Mantid

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May 2011

Beach Music
May 31, 2011

Beach Music

LISTEN: Open the mp3 file


Alston Wilkes Society
May 30, 2011

Alston Wilkes Society

LISTEN: Open the mp3 file


Westos
May 27, 2011

Westos

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Tobacco
May 26, 2011

Tobacco

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Sandhills
May 25, 2011

Sandhills

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Ribault, Jean
May 24, 2011

Ribault, Jean

LISTEN: Open the mp3 file


Pellagra
May 23, 2011

Pellagra

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Mauldin, SC
May 20, 2011

Mauldin, SC

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Legare, Hugh S.
May 19, 2011

Legare, Hugh S.

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Johnson, Wm H.
May 18, 2011

Johnson, Wm H.

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Harris, Emily J. L.
May 17, 2011

Harris, Emily, J. L.

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Gibbons, Leeza
May 16, 2011

Gibbons, Leeza

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Kirkland, Richard R.
May 13, 2011

Kirkland, Richard R.

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Jeremiah, Thomas
May 12, 2011

Jeremiah, Thomas

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Irish
May 11, 2011

Irish

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Hampton-Preston Mansion
May 10, 2011

Hampton-Preston Manner

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Geeger, Emily
May 09, 2011

Geeger, Emily

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Fort Hill
May 06, 2011

Fort Hill

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Elliot, Robert Brown
May 05, 2011

Elliot, Robert Brown

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Dennis, Rembert Coney
May 04, 2011

Dennis, Rembert Coney

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Carolina I-house
May 03, 2011

Carolina I-house

LISTEN: Open the mp3 file


Battery Wagner
May 02, 2011

Battery Wagner

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April 2011

Alston, Joseph
April 29, 2011

Alston, Joseph

LISTEN: Open the mp3 file


Westmoreland, William Childs
April 28, 2011

Westmoreland, William Childs

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Toal, Jean Hoefer
April 27, 2011

Toal, Jean Hoefer

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Sanders, Dorinda [Sua] Watsee
April 26, 2011

Sanders, Dorinda [Sua] Watsee

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Rhett, Robert Brown
April 25, 2011

Rhett, Robert Brown

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T is for Thompson, Hugh Smith
April 20, 2011

T is for Thompson, Hugh Smith

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S is for St. Peter’s Parish
April 19, 2011

S is for St. Peter's Parish

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R is for Reed, Jacob
April 18, 2011

R is for Reed, Jacob circa 1752 - 1816

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March 2008

Kilgo, James Patrick
March 07, 2008

Kilgo, James Patrick

LISTEN: Open the mp3 file


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